Using a Network Analysis Framework to Discuss Delivery of Mosquito Abatement Services in Machala, Ecuador

Authors: Catherine A Lippi*, Department of Geography and Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Anna M Stewart-Ibarra, Center for Global Health and Translational Science and Department of Medicine, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, Liang Mao, Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Naveed Heydari, Center for Global Health and Translational Science and Department of Medicine, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, Sadie J Ryan, Department of Geography and Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Topics: Medical and Health Geography
Keywords: Dengue, Ecuador, mosquito, network analysis
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/10/2018
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM
Room: Lafayette, Marriott, River Tower Elevators, 41st Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Dengue fever places a high burden on the coastal city of Machala, Ecuador (pop. 245,972), both in terms of human cases and financial strain on the community. There is currently no medical treatment for dengue fever outside of palliative care. Therefore, comprehensive vector control programs remain the primary method of controlling human disease outcomes through the reduction of mosquito populations. In Machala, vector control services are delivered through two deployment hubs managed by the Ecuadorian Ministry of Health. Currently, public health professionals in Machala face several logistical issues when delivering mosquito abatement services, namely how to use limited resources in ways that will most effectively suppress dengue transmission. Mosquito control services, such as application of larvicides and truck-mounted Ultra Low Volume (ULV) fogging, are not performed in a systematic manner. Using a transportation network analysis framework, we have built preliminary models of service delivery routes based on the costs associated with accessing census blocks throughout the city. These models are compared to the underlying epidemiological risk of dengue fever in Machala, creating a tool to guide decision makers and maximize the efficiency of mosquito control programs.

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