The Integration of Optical and Microwave Space Data to Locate Potential Sites for Groundwater Exploration in Eastern Sudan

Authors: Sarah Eure*, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Eman Ghoneim, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Fawad Razai, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington, Ganawa Eltayeb, Department of Geoinformatics, the Future University, Sudan
Topics: Water Resources and Hydrology, Remote Sensing, Africa
Keywords: Groundwater, Hydrology, Water Resources
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/12/2018
Start / End Time: 1:20 PM / 3:00 PM
Room: Napoleon Foyer/Common St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


An increase in urban and agriculture activities in Sudan has led to a water deficiency and an increased interest in exploring new locations for groundwater accumulation. In a region with an arid climate such as Sudan, finding areas with groundwater recharge are predicted by analyzing the hydrology of drainage basins during periods of relatively high precipitation. Information from physiographic characteristics was used to create a hydrological model employed by drainage networks delineated from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), surface cover distributions from satellite imagery, and rainfall estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Using SRTM for the Eastern portion of Sudan flow accumulation, flow direction, stream order and watersheds were created to illustrate where the precipitation accumulates. Results show a relatively large watershed stretches from the Red Sea Hills until just East of the Nile River. To determine the possibility of an aquifer, Landsat multi-spectral and thermal imagery was used to survey surface and near surface water accumulation just below the watershed after periods of heavy rainfall, which showed slight overflows from minor tributary systems. Synthetic Aperture Radar data will be used to gain insight of general groundwater accumulation in the area to determine if this aquifer could be a potential site to drill wells. The study illuminates the ability of the SRTM in penetrating desert sand surfaces and recording drainage systems used in conjunction with RADAR data recognizing subsurface networks.

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