Spatial Pattern of Tuberculosis in Nigeria: A Review of Access to Services

Authors: Theresa Abah*, University of North Texas - Denton, JOSEPH OPPONG, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS, DENTON TEXAS., GANESH BANIYA, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS, DENTON TEXAS
Topics: Human-Environment Geography, Africa
Keywords: tuberculosis, access to services, Nigeria, developing countries, spatial pattern
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/14/2018
Start / End Time: 4:00 PM / 5:40 PM
Room: Grand Ballroom D, Astor, 2nd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Despite significant progress in diagnosis, treatment and prevention since 2000, tuberculosis remains a raging global epidemic, particularly in developing countries. TB incidence rates continue to rise due to high population and socioeconomic transitions. Nigeria, one of the high burden countries (HBC), reported 490,000 new cases in 2009, but is projected to report over 2 million cases by 2020 if the recurring problems of under reporting of new TB cases, health seeking behavior of TB patients, financing of TB programs/medications, and surveillance of TB implementation program processes continue. Of greater concern is the mix of multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB) and TB/HIV (Human immunodeficiency virus). To address this pressing problem, we need to know the geographic patterns of TB spread and the associated gaps in TB control services.

This paper examines the spatial pattern of TB in Nigeria, the explanatory factors, and evaluates the distribution of TB treatment and control services. The results suggest that areas and people that need the most services are frequently those that have the poorest access to them. Understanding the factors preventing the use of TB services and related challenges is important for effective TB control in Nigeria and other similar countries.

Keywords: tuberculosis, access to services, Nigeria, developing countries, spatial pattern

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