Place, Health, and the Geography of Embodiment: Intergenerational Participatory Research for Representation/as Resistance in The Ville

Authors: Ryan Petteway*, Portland State University, OHSU-PSU School of Public Health
Topics: Geography and Urban Health, Medical and Health Geography, Qualitative Methods
Keywords: place, participatory research, intergenerational, social epidemiology, embodiment, public housing, resistance, representation, crowdsourcing
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/13/2018
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM
Room: Studio 8, Marriott, 2nd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


BACKGROUND:
Understanding place and health his now a core focus of public health research/practice. However, many local health departments (LHDs) face fiscal, political, and jurisdictional limitations that compromise efforts to assess and equitably respond to local place-health concerns. This is particularly true of smaller LHDs that oftentimes do not have dedicated epidemiologists/GIS specialists. Moreover, community resident perspective is seldom included in LHD community assessment plans/practice, and youth tend to be excluded entirely.

PURPOSE:
I report on an intergenerational community-based participatory research (CBPR) study of place and health among public housing residents—People’s Social Epi Project (PSEP). PSEP—beyond serving as a community health assessment—was envisioned as an avenue to shape local discourse regarding public housing, a method to represent/re-present important community spaces, and a tactic to resist/counter efforts to, in the words of residents, “wipe us off the map”. Through this work, I will: 1) introduce X-Ray Mapping as a participatory method to elucidate residents’ “geographies of embodiment”, 2) highlight the value/utility of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in deepening resident participation in community assessment efforts, and 3) discuss the role of participatory research as resistance and for representation.

METHODS/PROCESS:
Parent-youth dyads were recruited and trained in four participatory methods, including X-Ray Mapping. Participants used X-Ray Mapping and a multimedia-enabled web-based mapping platform to map their “geographies of embodiment”.

CONCLUSION:
ICTs anchored in CBPR afford the opportunity to move towards more inclusive and equitable community assessment models, and as such present as an avenue to democratize public health research/practice and “socialize” epidemiology/geography.

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