Spatial-temporal evolution of shale oil development in the Marcellus Shale in the past century

Authors: Yang Liu*, Department of Geography and GIS, University of Cincinnati, Hongxing Liu, Department of Geography and GIS, University of Cincinnati, Xiaofang Wei, Department of Water Resources Management, Central State University, Bin Wu, Department of Geography and GIS, University of Cincinnati, Krishnakumar V. Nedunuri, Department of Water Resources Management, Central State University, Ramanitharan Kandiah, Department of Water Resources Management, Central State University, Subramania I. Sritharan, Department of Water Resources Management, Central State University
Topics: Applied Geography, Environment, Temporal GIS
Keywords: GIS, shale oil, spatial-temporal evolution, surface structure
Session Type: Illustrated Paper
Day: 4/13/2018
Start / End Time: 10:00 AM / 11:40 AM
Room: Canal St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


In this study, we examine the spatial-temporal evolution of oil/gas drilling development in the Marcelles Shale since 1900. The Marcelles Shale extends across Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and New York. Based on 430,000 records about the drilling time, location and type of oil/gas wells, we converted point data to continuous surface to depict the distribution of oil/gas wells using a kernel density function. The surface critical features such as peaks, pits, ridges, and valleys have been identified for each time period to characterize the spatial distribution of the shale oil development. The topological similarity and changes in the surface structure between different time periods have been analyzed. The waves of shale oil development booming represented by the temporal peaks are identified, and the occurrences and spatial diffusion of the shale oil development waves are investigated. The analysis results reveal two apparent booming waves induced by Class II injection drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Our analysis also shows that four significant drilling concentration areas were formed in Warren-McKean (1900s), Ritchie-Doddridge-Gilmer (1960s), Armstrong-Jefferson-Indiana (1970s), and Coshocton-Muskingum (1980s). The drilling hot spots consistently move and expand in the southeast and northeast directions. The findings about the spatial-temporal evolution of shale oil development would be useful for evaluation of the impacts of the shale oil developments on the local environment and human health.

Abstract Information

This abstract is already part of a session. View the session here.

To access contact information login