Ethnic Dimension to Income Inequality in Canadian Municipalities

Authors: S M Rafael Harun*, University of Waterloo
Topics: Ethnicity and Race, Economic Geography, Economic Geography
Keywords: ethnic minority, income inequality, Canada, Urban
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/11/2018
Start / End Time: 1:20 PM / 3:00 PM
Room: Grand Ballroom A, Astor, 2nd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Canada has experienced a rapid increase in income inequality since the 1990s’. As income inequality is critically associated with a country’s economic and social health, researchers have made a substantial contribution to understanding income inequalities both spatially and non-spatially. By focusing on the major Canadian metropolitan areas, research to date has identified trends of the changes in income disparities over space and time. However, the locations on which the studies were conducted also experience a substantial immigrant population influx, predominantly fom Asian countries, which is changing the social geography of the Canadian metropolis. Since immigrant brings in different skill sets and abilities, cultural values, and preferences, the relationship between income inequality and ethnic minorities may differ from the Canadians living in the country for life. However, no effort is noticed that explores the ethnic dimension of income inequality in Canada that will be essential to plan for a complete community. This study evaluates income inequality by ethnic origin for the major Canadian municipalities and identifies the trends from 1986 to 2011 using the Canadian Census and the National Household Survey data. The correlates explaining the relationship are also explored in the study. The findings suggest a considerable difference in income disparity status by ethnicity, which also varies across municipalities. The study establishes the current situation of income inequality among the ethnic minority groups and provides a platform to investigate further and unfold the underlying dynamics.

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