Linking Economic Geography Class with Community Development: A Case Study in East Texas

Authors: William Forbes*, Stephen F. Austin State University, Jose A. Flores, Stephen F. Austin State University, Randy K. George, Stephen F. Austin State University, Sadie E. Howard, Stephen F. Austin State University, Joshua D. Koerth, Stephen F. Austin State University, Timothy M. Krauhs, Stephen F. Austin State University, Conner M. Labure, Stephen F. Austin State University, Christopher M. McDougald, Stephen F. Austin State University, Sarah R. Nichols, Stephen F. Austin State University, Derek B. Thompson, Stephen F. Austin State University, Cody W. Vaughan, Stephen F. Austin State University, Allen M. Woodfin, Stephen F. Austin State University
Topics: Economic Geography, Development, Sustainability Science
Keywords: Community development, Minority involvement, Triple bottom line
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/13/2018
Start / End Time: 3:20 PM / 5:00 PM
Room: Napoleon Foyer/Common St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


The Center for a Livable World at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA) was awarded a contract by the City of Nacogdoches in fall 2014 to enhance the community’s ongoing efforts to improve quality of life. In the framework, economic, social, and environmental concerns—the “triple bottom line”—are connected and overlap. Each must be taken into account in order to ensure a balanced quality of life.The study was divided into two phases. In the first phase multiple research sources were explored, including previously commissioned studies of the community; existing data sources; and review of academic literature. Additionally, three opinion surveys and 18 focus groups tapped local preferences to help outline an ideal vision for the city’s future. SFA faculty experts then constructed an expansive, diverse menu of related initiatives and project options, delivered to the city’s leadership for prioritization. The second phase of the process was a study on how to achieve prioritized options. The project ended in summer 2017. Many potentially valuable projects did not make the final list. A spring 2018 economic geography class is developing more details on several of those potential projects, including: a microloan program; minority business incentives; creative place-making workshops; housing/energy conservation retrofitting incentives; and alternative transportation (bicycle lanes, buses, TOD, etc.). This poster presents preliminary findings on how such projects might be implemented.

Abstract Information

This abstract is already part of a session. View the session here.

To access contact information login