Use of Drones in 3D Cadaster: Comparison of flight types

Authors: Jose Manuel Madrigal-Gomez*, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias de la Información Geoespacial A.C , Jose Luis Silvan-Cardenas, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias de la Información Geoespacial A.C , Juan Manuel Nuñez-Hernandez, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias de la Información Geoespacial A.C , Jose Roberto Hernandez-Castro, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias de la Información Geoespacial A.C
Topics: Remote Sensing, Urban Geography
Keywords: 3D Cadaster, Photogrammetry, Drones, UAS
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/13/2018
Start / End Time: 1:20 PM / 3:00 PM
Room: Napoleon Foyer/Common St. Corridor, Sheraton, 3rd Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


We present preliminary results from a funded project on the use of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAS) for the 3D reconstruction of buildings in areas of interest for the cadaster in Mexico City. Specifically, we report results from the comparison of two flight missions (circular and double grid) using a DJI’s drone with a flight height of 60 meters above the ground, which yielded an average ground sampling distance of 3 cm. The test was carried out on two contiguous buildings (a four-stories mexican rustic house and a glass tower). We collected 3 ground control points with differential GPS for aerial triangulation. The photographs were processed in Pix4D software to generate registered dense pointclouds and ortophotos with sub meter accuracy. Groundtruth distances of building features were measured horizontally and vertically using metric tape and a TruPulse 360 R laser range finder, Laser Technology Inc. and compared with those taken directly from the point cloud with the software. The root mean squared error computed on all distances was 2.9cm for the circular flight and of 2.7cm for the double grid flight, but this dropped to 1.5cm and 1.4cm for horizontal distances, and increased to 3.4cm and 3.4cm for vertical distances, for the circular and double grid flights, respectively. This assessment showed that a double grid flight yields better accuracy than circular flights, at least for horizontal distances; besides, the circular mission produced a much lower spatial extension of the ortophoto used for planimetric mapping.

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