Ancient poets’ mobility and the transition of culture centre based on poem data

Authors: Shen Ying*, School of Resource and Environmental Sciences, Wuhan Universtiy, Zhaopeng Wang, Digital Human Resources Research Center, South-central University For Nationalities, Dawei Shao, Digital Human Resources Research Center, South-central University For Nationalities, Jingyang Hou, School of Resource and Environmental Sciences, Wuhan University, Min Weng, School of Resource and Environmental Sciences, Wuhan University, Heng Wu, School Of Economics and Management, Wuhan University
Topics: Cultural Geography, China
Keywords: mobility, culture, big data, poem
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: 8223, Park Tower Suites, Marriott, Lobby Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Exploring the ancients’ mobility is a difficult field because of lacking sufficient history records. Chinese long history produced many well-known poems, and the poets, the authors of the poems, were a special group who had the roles of civilian, culture and politics. Each poem was written by a poet at certain place at certain time to describe some events or scenes, so with the big data of poems we may mine the potential distribution of the poets from spatial and temporal analysis. The poems are a fold of social culture, and distribution and mobility of the poets may manifest the culture center at corresponding dynasty. Many poets had certain social and official positions, and their mobility presented the social situation and transition of the culture center. Based on poems and poets in TANG Dynasty and SONG Dynastry, this project aims to build the essential elements of the poems that include the time-snap, place/location, poet, then construct the historical trajectories of the poets, describe the poets’ ups and downs, and their spatial-temporal overlay. Further analyses are intended to explore the culture characteristics and cultural transition during TANG and SONG Dynasties.

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