Hurricane Harvey: Data Preservation and Analysis for Houston's Long Term Recovery

Authors: Bryan Evans*, Rice University - Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Katherine Ensor, Rice University - Department of Statistics , Rudy Guerra, Rice University - Department of Statistics , Jie Wu, Rice University - Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Hien Le, Rice University - Children's Environmental Health Initiative, Matthew Krause*, Rice University - Kinder Institute for Urban Research, William Fulton, Rice University - Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Claire Osgood, Rice University - Children's Environmental Health Initiative, Joshua Tootoo, Rice University - Children's Environmental Health Initiative, Ruiyang Li, Rice University - Children's Environmental Health Initiative, Jean Aroom, Rice University - Fondren Library GIS/Data Center
Topics: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters, Urban Geography, Applied Geography
Keywords: Houston, Greater Houston, Texas, Urban, Urban Data, Hurricane Harvey, Harvey, Gulf Coast, Cross-disciplinary research, GIS, Computing Environment
Session Type: Lightning Paper
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM
Room: Roosevelt 5, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


The Kinder Institute Urban Data Platform (UDP) is a secure data repository and an analytical computing environment that provides research-ready urban data for the Greater Houston Area. The Urban Data Platform facilitates cross-disciplinary research and community studies to advance knowledge and information about Houston's people, government, and built environment. The Urban Data Platform’s ability to house and curate data, particularly for catastrophic events such as Hurricane Harvey in 2017, provides researchers a single point of access for data, GIS and statistical analysis tools. Data sources on the Urban Data Platform are both sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) with extensive safeguards to protect individual’s identities and publically downloadable data sets. In the aftermath of disaster level events affecting Houston and the Gulf coast, there is a demand for tracking down disaster related data for recovery efforts and measuring the long term impacts on the region’s people from a socioeconomic and health perspective. As original data sources are discontinued or replaced with data from future tropical storms affecting the region, the Urban Data Platform will maintain citable data sources with uniquely minted Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for researchers to be able to cite their work as well as their data housed within the Urban Data Platform.

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