The effects of light, wind, and relative humidity on air temperature in an old-growth forest in Oregon

Authors: Ali Malek*, Oregon State University
Topics: Climatology and Meteorology, Mountain Environments, Earth Science
Keywords: Forest meteorology, micrometeorology, climatology,
Session Type: Guided Poster
Day: 4/3/2019
Start / End Time: 4:30 PM / 6:10 PM
Room: Roosevelt 3.5, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


The purpose of this research is to understand the effects of light intensity, wind speed, and relative humidity on HOBO and aspirated air temperature measurements in a single Douglas-fir tree in an old-growth forest in Western Oregon’s Cascades. The tree is instrumented with two types of sensors_ HOBO and fan aspirated. The sensors are mounted on both sides of the tree at different heights above the ground. The result of this study showed that the light affects temperature measurements at HOBO compared to the aspirated sensors at a greater extent. Besides, wind affects the measured temperature at the HOBO sensor compared to the aspirated ones more. The impact of light is greater when the wind speed is lower than 1m/s. When the wind speed is above 1m/s, light increases the measured temperature at the HOBO compared to the aspirated sensors by about 0.1 degree C per 1000 Lux. In terms of relative humidity, at values less than 80 %, no effect of light on the measured temperature at HOBO compared to aspirated sensors at 1.5 and 50 meter was found. In contrast, at the values larger than 80 %, light increases the temperature at the HOBO sensors compared to the aspirated ones by about 0.13 degree C per 1000 Lux. In conclusion, the measured air temperature at HOBO sensor at 50-meter height is less affected by the light when the relative humidity and the wind speed are larger than 80 % and 1m/s respectively.

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