Exploring the relationship between urbanization, innovation and CO2 emissions: Evidence from three major urban agglomerations in China

Authors: Yanwen Sheng*, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Yi Miao, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Jinping Song, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University
Topics: Human-Environment Geography, Sustainability Science, Economic Geography
Keywords: CO2 emissions; Urbanization; Innovation, Spatial economic model, Chinses urban agglomerations
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/6/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM
Room: Lincoln 2, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


This study investigates the relationship between urbanization, innovation and CO2 emissions, paying particular attention to the issue of how innovation influences the effect of urbanization on CO2 emissions in urban agglomerations considering the spatial spillover effect between cities. Therefore, based on a panel data of 48 cities of the three major urban agglomerations in China during 2001-2015, we used a spatial economic model to estimate the effect of urbanization and innovation on CO2 emissions. The empirical results indicate that the relationship between urbanization and CO2 emission follows a U-shaped curve in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, an N-shaped curve in the Yangtze River Delta and an inverted N-shaped pattern in the Pearl River Delta. Additionally, although innovation did not exert a direct effect on CO2 emissions in the three urban agglomerations, it plays an important moderating role between urbanization and CO2 emissions in the urban agglomerations, suggesting that reducing the positive impacts of urbanization on CO2 emissions depends on innovative development. In addition, the CO2 emissions of cities presented a clearly negative spatial spillover effect among the cities in the three urban agglomerations. These findings and the following policy implications will contribute to reducing CO2 emissions.

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