Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) in High-Need Areas: How Health Centers can Improve Access to Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder with Vulnerable Populations

Authors: Michael Topmiller*, HealthLandscape, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), Jennifer Rankin, HealthLandscape, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), Mark Carrozza, HealthLandscape, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), David Grolling, HealthLandscape, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), Hank Hoang, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA), Alek Sripipatana, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Topics: Medical and Health Geography, Applied Geography, Geographic Information Science and Systems
Keywords: opioids, medication-assisted treatment (MAT), health centers, hot spots
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: Lincoln 2, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Background: The opioid epidemic is adversely affecting cities across the US and disproportionately impacting vulnerable populations. Health centers are well-positioned to increase access to treatment. Objective: To identify health centers located in high-need areas based on drug poisoning mortality and explore their capacity to provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Methodology: Outlier and hot-spot analysis identify high-need counties based on drug poisoning mortality. We will overlay mapped health centers and stratify by current and potential capacity for MAT (based on their number of Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA) waived providers and patients receiving MAT). Results: The results include maps and lists of health centers stratified by need (defined by drug-related mortality), health center capacity (defined by number of DATA waivers), and MAT use (defined by the number of MAT patients). Discussion: The results can be used to support the role of health centers in providing treatment for opioid use disorder and inform future research and policies. For example, high-need awardees with low capacity can be targeted for outreach and funding to increase number of DATA waived physicians; high-need awardees with high capacity but low current MAT use can be targeted for research, outreach, and better understand how to close gaps in OUD care; and finally, high-need awardees with high capacity and high current MAT use can be targeted for research to understand why they have been successful and how they have overcome barriers.

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