Social-ecological and resilience trait-based approach for spatial planning and analysis of urban gardens in Indianapolis, Indiana

Authors: Bhuwan Thapa*, Department of Geography, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, Jeffrey Wilson, Department of Geography, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, Heather Reynolds, Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Aniruddha Banerjee, Department of Geography, Indiana University - Purdue University - Indianapolis, Sarah Mincey, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, Robert D. Montoya, School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, Indiana University, Bloomington, Samantha Hamlin, Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, Erin Hatch, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, Abigail Sullivan, Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, Amy Elizabeth Doster, School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, Indiana University, Bloomington, Dana Habeeb, School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, Indiana University, Bloomington
Topics: Urban Geography, food systems, Coupled Human and Natural Systems
Keywords: Urban food system, urban planning, optimization, institution, neighborhood groups, quantitative analysis
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/6/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM
Room: Lincoln 2, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Urban gardens can offer multiple benefits, including supplementing food security, strengthening social capital, promoting ecosystem services, and building community resilience. Optimizing these benefits requires strategic planning that considers the dynamic interactions between socio-institutional, ecological and biophysical systems. To this end, we propose an explicitly social-ecological and resilience trait-based planning framework that can be applied to urban gardens as well as to other forms of urban green infrastructure. Using heterogeneous and high resolution spatial datasets on institutional, social and biophysical attributes of urban gardens and local communities, we perform a series of spatial analyses focused on optimizing urban garden accessibility as a key dimension of resilience. Our approach helps to push the field of urban green infrastructure planning towards more holistic analysis and contributes to the empirical literature on the equity and accessibility of urban food producing spaces.

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