Spatial accessibility of agritourism farms in Florida using Gravity Model

Authors: Hoda Manafian*, PhD candidate of Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Yu-Hua Xu, PhD student of Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Jinwon Kim, Assistant Professors of Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Angelica Almeyda Zambrano, Assistant Professors of Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida
Topics: Tourism Geography
Keywords: Spatial accessibility, Gravity Model, Agritourism, Florida
Session Type: Poster
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 1:10 PM / 2:50 PM
Room: Lincoln 2, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Tourist behavior and taking advantage of cultural services offered by tourism destinations are highly influenced by the level of accessibility. To develop agritourism, spatial measurement of access to agritourism farms can assist policy makers and managers to facilitate public use and can help marketers to segment the target groups effectively. However, a crucial question is what the most reliable model to measure the accessibility to agritourism services. Gravity model can cover simultaneously the effect of three major factors on accessibility including agritourism services’ demand and supply as well as physical distance (a crucial barrier factor on accessibility). We valuate the accessibility by defining a gravity-based index for each farm describing the spatial pattern of accessibility. Using that identified index we can define the most and least accessible farms for pattern and level of access to agritourism farms for local visitors (FL residents). We used the census block (2012) with the total population as well as the distribution map of agritourism farms including the type and number of cultural services each farm offers. The findings reveal that the accessibility to agri-farms’ services varies spatially. In northern Florida, most of the census tracks have a higher level of accessibility, while in southern Florida, the local population has much less accessibility to farm tourism services. This should result from the distribution of farms lands and population in the north and south Florida: the north encompasses a much larger area of farmlands, while the more to the south, the fewer farmlands exists.

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