Anthropocene Anxieties: Post-humanist and psychoanalytic approaches in dialogue with political ecology

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Animal Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM
Room: Roosevelt 4, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Organizers: Paul Robbins, Karen Bakker
Chairs: Karen Bakker

Call for Submissions

In an era of unpredictable, at times chaotic, and often irreversible environmental change, people and institutions are navigating a post-normal, Anthropocene or Capitalocene world (Escobar 2018, Haraway 2016, Moore 2015, Robbins and Moore 2013). The multi-faceted dimensions of contemporary anxieties—cognitive, emotional, relational, somatic, and psychological—been examined by scholars in “post-human” research traditions, as well as those in psychoanalytic traditions (e.g. in terms of anxiety, repression, and the unconscious) (Kingsbury and Pile 2016, Kirsch 2015, Lertzman 2015, Moore et al 2018, Shaw and Bonnett 2016, Walton and Shaw 2015). Yet these issues have rarely been examined by scholars in political ecology. As a result, fundamental questions of political ecology--including production of scarcity/abundance, transformation of landscapes, and struggle over the control and meaning of the natural world--remain largely estranged from post-humanist and psychoanalytic modes of analysis. This session seeks to begin to fill that gap, by advancing a dialogue between post-human, psychoanalytic, and political ecological research. We are specifically focused on the synergies of these traditions, and committed to a dialogue that deploys both post-humanist and psychoanalytic research to demonstrate, explore, and confound our understanding of material and lived politics of the environment. We encourage both conceptual and empirical papers, particularly those that provide fresh insight into how things happen (in resource management, conservation, and the provision and politics of energy/water/food), and how things might happen differently.

Paul Kingsbury is confirmed as a participant in this session.

Organizers: Paul Robbins, Sarah Moore, Karen Bakker

Contact: Paul Robbins: director@nelson.wisc.edu

References

Escobar, A. (2018). Designs for the pluriverse: radical interdependence, autonomy, and the making of worlds. Duke University Press.
Haraway, D. J. (2016). Staying with the trouble: Making kin in the Chthulucene. Duke University Press.
Kingsbury, P., & Pile, S. (2016). Psychoanalytic Geographies. Routledge.
Kirsch, S. (2015). Cultural geography III: Objects of culture and humanity, or, re-‘thinging’the Anthropocene landscape. Progress in Human Geography, 39(6), 818-826.
Lertzman, R. (2015). Environmental melancholia: Psychoanalytic dimensions of engagement. Routledge.
Moore, J. W. (2015). Capitalism in the Web of Life: Ecology and the Accumulation of Capital. Verso Books.
Moore, S. A., Rosenfeld, H., & Rafi Arefin, M. (2018). Generating anxiety, short-circuiting desire: Battery waste and the capitalist phantasy. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 0263775818777249.
Robbins, P., & Moore, S. A. (2013). Ecological anxiety disorder: diagnosing the politics of the Anthropocene. cultural geographies, 20(1), 3-19.
Shaw, W. S., & Bonnett, A. (2016). Environmental crisis, narcissism and the work of grief. cultural geographies, 23(4), 565-579.
Walton, Todd, and Wendy S. Shaw. "Living with the Anthropocene blues." Geoforum 60 (2015): 1-3.


Description

In an era of unpredictable, at times chaotic, and often irreversible environmental change, people and institutions are navigating a post-normal, Anthropocene or Capitalocene world. The multi-faceted dimensions of contemporary anxieties—cognitive, emotional, relational, somatic, and psychological—been examined by scholars in “post-human” research traditions, as well as those in psychoanalytic traditions (e.g. in terms of anxiety, repression, and the unconscious. Yet these issues have rarely been examined by scholars in political ecology. As a result, fundamental questions of political ecology--including production of scarcity/abundance, transformation of landscapes, and struggle over the control and meaning of the natural world--remain largely estranged from post-humanist and psychoanalytic modes of analysis. This session seeks to begin to fill that gap, by advancing a dialogue between post-human, psychoanalytic, and political ecological research. We are specifically focused on the synergies of these traditions, and committed to a dialogue that deploys both post-humanist and psychoanalytic research to demonstrate, explore, and confound our understanding of material and lived politics of the environment. We encourage both conceptual and empirical papers, particularly those that provide fresh insight into how things happen (in resource management, conservation, and the provision and politics of energy/water/food), and how things might happen differently.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Mohammed Arefin*, New York University, The Abject in History: Psychoanalysis, Political Economy, and Waste in Archives 20 9:55 AM
Presenter Heidi Hausermann*, Colorado State University, David Ferring , Rutgers University , Malaria & Mental Health: The Political Ecology of Landscape Change and Cumulative Vulnerability in Central Ghana's Gold Mining Country 20 10:15 AM
Presenter Jared Margulies*, University of Sheffield, Desire and the non-human: the illicit cactus and affective geographies of extinction 20 10:35 AM
Presenter Dawn Hoogeveen*, University of Northern British Columbia, Sarah de Leeuw, University of Northern British Columbia, Ecological Anxiety: Emotional Geographies of Resource Extraction and Regulation 20 10:55 AM
Discussant Paul Kingsbury Simon Faser University 15 11:15 AM

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