Bagels and bytes 2: Geographies of food in our precarious present

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group, Political Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 5:00 PM / 6:40 PM (Eastern Standard Time)
Room: Washington 2, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Organizers: Benjamin Schrager, Christine Barnes
Chairs: Benjamin Schrager

Call for Submissions

The uproar over Cynthia Nixon’s bagel order in September 2018 reminds us of the contentious and politicized nature of eating, where ideas of food are increasingly mediated by digital and fragmented representations. This CFP delves into uneasiness over food in our precarious present. Bagels evoke clashes over culture, cuisine and place. Bagels are also symbolic of how we can never tell the whole story of food: something is always missing. We can only ‘follow the thing’ so far and in so many directions. As geographers, we face a unique challenge to choose the most interesting aspects of a commodity, to delve into the most significant aspects of everyday practice. What stories about food do we need to tell to understand our precarious present? And how should we promote more just relations through food?

Bytes cuts two ways. First, digital platforms are transforming food business and experiences. Instagram, Yelp, and Bite Squad are all digital platforms that shape food perceptions, performativity, and practices. Digital foodscapes raise important ontological questions about how we know and understand contemporary food culture and food politics. How, for example, does food change as it moves between online and offline? How are our relationships with food, and what we can do with food, altered by digitized food culture?

Bytes also references how technoscientific innovations continue to deepen scientific understandings of agriculture, food, and health. Researchers aspire to unravel the secrets hidden within seeds, nutrition, bacteria, immunity, and disease. Technology allows new food products such as cultured meats to be developed and brought to market, existing foods to be repurposed, and commodity chains made traceable through Blockchain. What are the impacts of this knowledge? And how is technology altering what and how we eat?

The present feels precarious because of political unrest, new digital technologies, global warming, and corporate consolidation to name a few. Despite these bleak trends, food can be an empowering symbol for mobilization and resistance.

This CFP welcomes submissions of papers that explore geographies of food in our precarious present.

Please submit abstracts (under 250 words) to abstracts (under 250 words) to both christine.barnes@kcl.ac.uk and schrager@hawaii.edu by October 25th, 2018.

Session Organizers:
Christine Barnes, King's College London
Benjamin Schrager, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa


Description

Paper session(s) with 5 presenters or 4 presenters and a discussant.

The uproar over Cynthia Nixon’s bagel order in September 2018 reminds us of the contentious and politicized nature of eating, where ideas of food are increasingly mediated by digital and fragmented representations. This CFP delves into uneasiness over food in our precarious present. Bagels evoke clashes over culture, cuisine and place. Bagels are also symbolic of how we can never tell the whole story of food: something is always missing. We can only ‘follow the thing’ so far and in so many directions. As geographers, we face a unique challenge to choose the most interesting aspects of a commodity, to delve into the most significant aspects of everyday practice. What stories about food do we need to tell to understand our precarious present? And how should we promote more just relations through food?

Bytes cuts two ways. First, digital platforms are transforming food business and experiences. Instagram, Yelp, and Bite Squad are all digital platforms that shape food perceptions, performativity, and practices. Digital foodscapes raise important ontological questions about how we know and understand contemporary food culture and food politics. How, for example, does food change as it moves between online and offline? How are our relationships with food, and what we can do with food, altered by digitized food culture?

Bytes also references how technoscientific innovations continue to deepen scientific understandings of agriculture, food, and health. Researchers aspire to unravel the secrets hidden within seeds, nutrition, bacteria, immunity, and disease. Technology allows new food products such as cultured meats to be developed and brought to market, existing foods to be repurposed, and commodity chains made traceable through Blockchain. What are the impacts of this knowledge? And how is technology altering what and how we eat?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Mylene De Guzman*, University of the Philippines, Cyberfoodscapes: Instagramming the Ybanag Delicacy, Batil Patung 20 5:00 PM
Presenter Christine Barnes*, King's College London, Jamie Oliver and the Spectacular Biopolitics of Eating Sugar 20 5:20 PM
Presenter Jennifer Bernstein*, , What’s In The Box? Meal Delivery Kits and the Modern Food Landscape 20 5:40 PM
Presenter Caroline Howe*, UDC, Mapping the Social, Environmental and Economic Complexity in Food Recovery Pathways Using System Dynamics 20 6:00 PM
Discussant Terry Marsden Cardiff University 20 6:20 PM

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