Current and Future Directions of Geography's Role in Redistricting and Gerrymandering Studies

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Political Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Population Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 1:10 PM / 2:50 PM
Room: Maryland A, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Ryan Weichelt
Chairs: Ryan Weichelt

Call for Submissions

For the most part, the electoral redistricting process is inherently a spatial question. Geographic compactness and equal population of districts are key components of the evaluation criteria used in the legal review process of districting fairness. Yet research on the topic is generally devoid of geographers, leaving political scientists, mathematicians, and lawyers as the go-to experts on the topic. With recent court cases in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina engaging new audiences regarding the topic, perhaps it is time geographers step forth and take a larger role in directing the narratives on redistricting in the United States.

The following session is tasked with exploring research avenues focusing on the broader issues of the redistricting process. This session asks why aren’t geographers part of the national discussion of redistricting? How can geography gain greater acceptance as experts regarding redistricting? What does geography offer to the study of redistricting? We welcome papers from all avenues of geographic thought regarding redistricting. Interested presenters are asked to submit abstracts for consideration to Ryan Weichelt weicherd@uwec.edu


Description

For the most part, the electoral redistricting process is inherently a spatial question. Geographic compactness and equal population of districts are key components of the evaluation criteria used in the legal review process of districting fairness. Yet research on the topic is generally devoid of geographers, leaving political scientists, mathematicians, and lawyers as the go-to experts on the topic. With recent court cases in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina engaging new audiences regarding the topic, perhaps it is time geographers step forth and take a larger role in directing the narratives on redistricting in the United States.

The following session is tasked with exploring research avenues focusing on the broader issues of the redistricting process. This session asks why aren’t geographers part of the national discussion of redistricting? How can geography gain greater acceptance as experts regarding redistricting? What does geography offer to the study of redistricting? We welcome papers from all avenues of geographic thought regarding redistricting. Interested presenters are asked to submit abstracts for consideration to Ryan Weichelt weicherd@uwec.edu


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Kalyn Rossiter*, Ohio Northern University, David W.S. Wong, George Mason University, Congressional Districts: How "Equal" Are They? 20 1:10 PM
Presenter Christopher Fowler*, Pennsylvania State University, Linda L Fowler, Dartmouth College, The problem of electoral districts when the population is well sorted 20 1:30 PM
Presenter Matthew Ruiz*, University of Northern Iowa, The Erosion of Democracy: Gerrymandering in the United States 20 1:50 PM
Presenter John Hessler*, Library of Congress, Algorithmic Democracy: Mathematical and Supercomputer Approaches to Gerrymandering 20 2:10 PM
Presenter David Plane*, University of Arizona, Daoqin Tong, Arizona State University, Inter-person Separation and the Fundamental Basis of Territorially Defined Political Representation 20 2:30 PM

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