Southern Queer (In)Visibilities

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Study of the American South Specialty Group, Cultural Geography Specialty Group, Sexuality and Space Specialty Group, Careers and Professional Development
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM (Eastern Standard Time)
Room: Wilson A, Marriott, Mezzanine Level
Organizers: Rachael Cofield
Chairs: Rachael Cofield

Call for Submissions

This session aims to reframe the South as not simply the domain of cis-white heterosexual men, but instead characterize the region as malleable, changing, diverse, and full of possibility. This session seeks papers that focus on women’s and LGBTQ issues in the U.S. South, both theoretically and empirically, and that highlight the contributions and presence of women and LGBTQ peoples within the American South. The following is a sample of possible paper themes:

• Queering the American South
• Embodied experiences of women/LGBTQ peoples in the American South
• Navigating multi-scalar spaces of the American South
• Intersectionality
• Body politics and the American South

If you are interested in presenting in this session, please send your abstract to Rachael Cofield (rsc15@my.fsu.edu) by Friday, October 19, 2018.


Description

Geography about the southeastern United States often discusses landscape, memory, and civil rights issues (specifically in terms of race). This body of work focuses on agricultural and rural landscape, as well as the relationship between southerness of the land and history. Race is also a major topic of discussion, and certainly the South has a complicated history with civil rights. However, it has not been until recent years that a specific focus on social justice and critical theory emerged. This can be seen in works by Winders (2005, 2007), Dwyer and Alderman (2008), and Inwood (2010). Work on heritage and public memory (Leib 2002; Inwood and Martin, 2008; Alderman, 2010), demonstrate the enduring strength of historic memory as well as continuity in the South, all the while pursuing how the region may be changing despite a troubled past. Social justice concerns have only recently come to the forefront of southern geography at large, with racial/ethnic segregation being an exception (Alderman, 2007). However, there is still a notable lack of study and focus on southern women and LGBTQ lives within the geographic discipline, despite calls for more explicitly queer research in the South (Eaves, 2017). This session seeks to help fill this gap, contributing to work by Eaves (2017) and Doan (2015), as well as the body of literature outside of geography (Johnson 2008; Herring 2010). Geography has a unique opportunity and ability to explore contemporary socio-spatial experiences of women and queer peoples.

This session aims to reframe the South as not simply the domain of cis-white heterosexual men, but instead characterize the region as malleable, changing, diverse, and full of possibility. This session seeks papers that focus on women’s and LGBTQ issues in the U.S. South, both theoretically and empirically, and that highlight the contributions and presence of women and LGBTQ peoples within the American South. The following is a sample of possible paper themes:

• Queering the American South
• Embodied experiences of women/LGBTQ peoples in the American South
• Navigating multi-scalar spaces of the American South
• Intersectionality
• Body politics and the American South

References:

Alderman, D.H. 2007. Forum on Social Justice in the South: Introduction. Southeastern Geographer, 47(1), 86-91.
Alderman, D.H. 2010. Surrogation and the politics of remembering slavery in Savannah, Georgia (USA). Journal of Historical Geography, 36, 90-101.
Doan, P.L. 2015. Understanding LGBTQ-Friendly Neighborhoods in the American South: The Trade-off Between Visibility and Acceptance. In P.L. Doan (Ed), Planning and LBGTQ Communities: The Need for Inclusive Queer Spaces, New York, New York: Routledge.
Dwyer, O.J., and Alderman, D.H. 2008. Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press.
Eaves, L.E. 2017. Black Geographic possibilities: On a Queer Black South. Southeastern Geographer, 57(1), 80-95.
Herring, S. 2010. Another Country: Queer Anti-Urbanism. New York: New York University Press.
Johnson, E.P. Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History, University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
Inwood, J. 2010. Sweet Auburn: Constructing Atlanta’s Auburn Avenue as a heritage tourist destination. Urban Geography, 31, 573–594.
Inwood, J. and Martin, D. 2008. Whitewash: White privilege and racialized landscapes at the University of Georgia. Social & Cultural Geography, 9, 373–395.
Leib, J.I. 2002. Separate times, shared spaces: Arthur Ashe, Monument Avenue and the politics of Richmond, Virginia’s symbolic landscape. Cultural Geographies, 9, 286– 312.
Winders, J. 2005. Changing politics of race and region: Latino migration to the US South. Progress in Human Geography, 29, 683–699.
Winders, J. 2007. Bringing back the (b)order: Post-9/11 politics of immigration, borders, and belonging in the contemporary US South. Antipode, 39, 920–942.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Rachael Cofield*, Florida State University, A New South: LGBTQ Urban Life in Atlanta, Georgia 20 8:00 AM
Presenter Amy Stone*, , Debutantes, Mardi Gras, and Mock Coronations: LGBTQ Space and Cultural Structures of the Urban South 20 8:20 AM
Presenter Petra Doan*, Florida State University, Southern Queer Spaces as Urban Ephemera: the Ybor City Neighborhood of Tampa 20 8:40 AM
Presenter LaToya Eaves*, Middle Tennessee State University, Southern Matters and Black Queer Women 20 9:00 AM
Presenter Kai Kenttamaa Squires*, McGill University, Miami is South of the South? South Florida and Southern Regional Queerness 20 9:20 AM

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