GIScience and Hazards in the Era of Big Data

Type: Paper
Theme: Geographies of Human Rights: The Right to Benefit from Scientific Progress
Sponsor Groups: Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/3/2019
Start / End Time: 4:30 PM / 6:10 PM
Room: Forum Room, Omni, West
Organizers: Bandana Kar
Chairs: Bandana Kar

Call for Submissions

With each major disaster, innovative applications of geographic information emerge. The convergence of technologies like social media, web-mapping, cloud computing, unmanned aerial systems, and location-based services is revolutionizing risk prediction, risk assessment and communication for emergency management and disaster response. At the same time, advancements are being made in modeling resilience, mapping hazards, and capturing real-time information from airborne (unmanned and manned) and satellite platforms. The result is a rapid change in the technological context for disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.


Extreme weather events have caused significant damage worldwide in recent years. In fact, 2017 was an expensive and deadly year that caused at least $306 billion worth damage. With record high extreme weather events across the world, the challenges are more focused on how best to use technology to reduce risk and prepare for future events by implementing not just forecasting approaches rather prescriptive analytics. This session seeks presentations focusing on using geospatial data and technology to understand, assess and forecast potential impacts of hazard events. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:


* Methods for modeling and mapping hazardscapes, risk, and vulnerability
* Spatial decision support systems in emergency management
* Dynamic geographic modeling in emergencies
* GIS/RS applications in mitigation, preparedness, response, or recovery
* The role of geographic information science and data in building community and infrastructure resilience
* Uncertainty in geographic data and modeling in emergencies
* Big data quality and its impact on emergency management activities
* Social media usage in response and recovery efforts
* Citizen science and its role in emergencies
* The dynamics of hazards and their impact on physical and social environments
* Role of remote sensing in disaster informatics, including exploitation of big data and dense satellite time-series.
* Incorporation of drones imagery in the response process
* The intersection of climate change and hazards

Organizers
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
Tom Cova, University of Utah, cova@geog.utah.edu
Michael Hodgson, University of South Carolina, hodgsonm@sc.edu
Rutherford Platt, Gettysburg College, rplatt@gettysburg.edu

If you would like to participate, please send us your abstract PIN and your abstract (250 words max) before October 20th, 2018.

Where/When: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 3-7, 2019, Washington DC. Additional information regarding the conference could be found at: http://annualmeeting.aag.org/.

Thanks to all of our presenters and to all who have attended these sessions over the years.


Description

With each major disaster, innovative applications of geographic information emerge. The convergence of technologies like social media, web-mapping, cloud computing, unmanned aerial systems, and location-based services is revolutionizing risk prediction, risk assessment and communication for emergency management and disaster response. At the same time, advancements are being made in modeling resilience, mapping hazards, and capturing real-time information from airborne (unmanned and manned) and satellite platforms. The result is a rapid change in the technological context for disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

Extreme weather events have caused significant damage worldwide in recent years. In fact, 2017 was an expensive and deadly year that caused at least $306 billion worth damage. With record high extreme weather events across the world, the challenges are more focused on how best to use technology to reduce risk and prepare for future events by implementing not just forecasting approaches rather prescriptive analytics. This session seeks presentations focusing on using geospatial data and technology to understand, assess and forecast potential impacts of hazard events.

Methods for modeling and mapping hazardscapes, risk, and vulnerability
* Spatial decision support systems in emergency management
* Dynamic geographic modeling in emergencies
* GIS/RS applications in mitigation, preparedness, response, or recovery
* The role of geographic information science and data in building community and infrastructure resilience
* Uncertainty in geographic data and modeling in emergencies
* Big data quality and its impact on emergency management activities
* Social media usage in response and recovery efforts
* Citizen science and its role in emergencies
* The dynamics of hazards and their impact on physical and social environments
* Role of remote sensing in disaster informatics, including exploitation of big data and dense satellite time-series.
* Incorporation of drones imagery in the response process
* The intersection of climate change and hazards

Organizers
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
Tom Cova, University of Utah, cova@geog.utah.edu
Michael Hodgson, University of South Carolina, hodgsonm@sc.edu
Rutherford Platt, Gettysburg College, rplatt@gettysburg.edu

If you would like to participate, please send us your abstract PIN and your abstract (250 words max) before October 20th, 2018.

Where/When: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 3-7, 2019, Washington DC. Additional information regarding the conference could be found at: http://annualmeeting.aag.org/.

Thanks to all of our presenters and to all who have attended these sessions over the years.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Volodymyr Mihunov*, Louisiana State University, Nina Lam, Louisiana State University, Dynamics of the Community Resilience to Drought Hazard in the South-Central United States 20 4:30 PM
Presenter Armita Kar*, Graduate Assisstant, Department of Geography, University of Utah, Thomas J Cova, Professor, Department of Geography, University of Utah, Vehicular Route Modelling for Safe Travel during Urban Flooding 20 4:50 PM
Presenter Michael Hodgson*, University of South Carolina, Zhenlong Li, University of South Carolina, Silvia Elena Piovan, University of Padova-Italy, Caglar Koylu, University of Iowa, Language and Twitter-based Social Media During Disaster Events 20 5:10 PM
Presenter Bandana Kar*, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Olufemi A. Omitaomu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Susan Kotikot, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Caleb Robinson, Georgia Tech University, Fernando Runte, Sam Houston State University, Evaluating the Effectiveness of VIIRS Day-Night Band Data for Power Outage Impact Assessment 20 5:30 PM

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