Risk Communication and Resilience

Type: Paper
Theme: Geographies of Human Rights: The Right to Benefit from Scientific Progress
Sponsor Groups: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group, Media and Communication Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 1:10 PM / 2:50 PM (Eastern Standard Time)
Room: Forum Room, Omni, West
Organizers: Bandana Kar, Xiaohui Liu, David Cochran
Chairs: David Cochran

Call for Submissions

Risk communication, defined as the exchange of information among stakeholders about a disaster with the intent to help people take risk reduction actions, is a central part of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Resilience is a process that increases capacity through the proactive and positive engagement of stakeholders so that disaster-impacted communities can quickly return to a pre-disaster state or even attain better-than-pre-disaster states, thereby enhancing sustainability. While risk communication is one aspect of building resilience, community resilience also can be improved by (i) increasing public awareness of risk and their role in risk reduction, (ii) assessing risk, (iii) increasing stakeholder participation in policy preparation and implementation, and (iv) sharing knowledge/information/lessons learned among communities. The collective experience of hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Florence indicate that social media plays an increasingly important role in disseminating information for preparation, response, and rescue. In light of these and other disasters, it is timely to discuss what actions should be taken to integrate citizen science, crowdsourcing, and risk communication in building resilient communities. Research topics include, but are not limited to:
• The effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of WEA and mobile devices in increasing risk communication coverage.
• The role of social media in increasing citizen participation and the issues and concerns expressed by emergency managers and the public regarding use of social media in risk communication and resilience building efforts.
• Proactive approaches to resilience (risk assessment, risk management, risk communication) that have been effective in reducing hazard impacts.
• How can social media be used to bolster emergency preparedness? How does social media influence resilience and recovery?
• What is the future of resilience-based research? Is there a difference between individual resilience and community resilience? Finally, is it possible for global society to reach a level of resilience where the impacts of hazards are negligible?

Organizers:
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
David Cochran, University of Southern Mississippi, david.cochran@usm.edu
Xiaohui Liu, Dalhousie University, Xliu@dal.ca
If you would like to participate, please send us your abstract PIN and your abstract (250 words max) before October 20th, 2018.

Where/When: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 3-7, 2019, Washington, D.C. Additional information regarding the conference may be found at: http://annualmeeting.aag.org/.

This will be the fifth consecutive year that we have organized the Risk Communication and Resilience sessions at AAG meetings. Thanks to all of our presenters and to all who have attended these sessions over the years.


Description

Risk communication, defined as the exchange of information among stakeholders about a disaster with the intent to help people take risk reduction actions, is a central part of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Resilience is a process that increases capacity through the proactive and positive engagement of stakeholders so that disaster-impacted communities can quickly return to a pre-disaster state or even attain better-than-pre-disaster states, thereby enhancing sustainability. While risk communication is one aspect of building resilience, community resilience also can be improved by (i) increasing public awareness of risk and their role in risk reduction, (ii) assessing risk, (iii) increasing stakeholder participation in policy preparation and implementation, and (iv) sharing knowledge/information/lessons learned among communities. The collective experience of hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Florence indicate that social media plays an increasingly important role in disseminating information for preparation, response, and rescue. In light of these and other disasters, it is timely to discuss what actions should be taken to integrate citizen science, crowdsourcing, and risk communication in building resilient communities. Research topics include, but are not limited to:
• The effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of WEA and mobile devices in increasing risk communication coverage.
• The role of social media in increasing citizen participation and the issues and concerns expressed by emergency managers and the public regarding use of social media in risk communication and resilience building efforts.
• Proactive approaches to resilience (risk assessment, risk management, risk communication) that have been effective in reducing hazard impacts.
• How can social media be used to bolster emergency preparedness? How does social media influence resilience and recovery?
• What is the future of resilience-based research? Is there a difference between individual resilience and community resilience? Finally, is it possible for global society to reach a level of resilience where the impacts of hazards are negligible?

Organizers:
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
David Cochran, University of Southern Mississippi, david.cochran@usm.edu
Xiaohui Liu, Dalhousie University, Xliu@dal.ca
If you would like to participate, please send us your abstract PIN and your abstract (250 words max) before October 20th, 2018.

Where/When: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 3-7, 2019, Washington, D.C. Additional information regarding the conference may be found at: http://annualmeeting.aag.org/.

This will be the fifth consecutive year that we have organized the Risk Communication and Resilience sessions at AAG meetings. Thanks to all of our presenters and to all who have attended these sessions over the years.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Sanam Aksha*, Virginia Tech, Lynn M. Resler, Virginia Tech, Luke Juran, Virginia Tech, Laurence W. Carstensen Jr., Virginia Tech, Multi-hazard risk assessment in Dharan, Nepal using geospatial techniques 20 1:10 PM
Presenter David Rickless*, University of Georgia, Xiaobai Yao, University of Georgia, Brian Orland, University of Georgia, Meredith Welch-Devine, University of Georgia, Assessing Social Vulnerability Through a Local Lens: An Integrated Geovisual Approach to Coastal Hazards 20 1:30 PM
Presenter David M Cochran*, University of Southern Mississippi, Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, What is the Best Emergency Warning Device? Perceptions of Households and Emergency Management Agencies on the Mississippi Gulf Coast 20 1:50 PM
Presenter Li Wang*, King's College London, David Demeritt, King's College London, Comparing food contamination and air pollution: how do social trust and different levels governments efficacy influence the public risk perceptions of the two risks differently in China? 20 2:10 PM
Presenter Jennifer Haney*, Bloomsburg University, Claire Havice, Bloomsburg University, Factors Influencing Evacuation Behavior in the Kīlauea Eruptions: An Examination of Residents in the Puna District, Hawaiʻi 20 2:30 PM

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