Critical Geographies of Education: Why bother with Educational Technologies?

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Digital Geographies Specialty Group, Geography Education Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM
Room: 8211, Park Tower Suites, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Siobhán Mcphee, Nina Hewitt
Chairs: Siobhán Mcphee

Call for Submissions

What are the pedagogical dos and don’ts in geographical education when it comes to technology? How should pedagogical framing influence our use of educational technologies? This session will explore these and related questions. The growing deployment of emerging educational technologies among higher education institutions, and within geography departments, raises many questions. The interdisciplinarity and geospatial nature of the discipline of Geography may position it well to lead in these endeavours, but this must be done reflectively and through active engaged learning.

We are in the age of ubiquitous computing where information and communication technologies have become firmly embedded in everyday life (Mehigan and Pitt, 2010) and with this comes an expectancy for researchers and educators to keep up with the pace of technology advancement (Traxler and Wishart 2011). Indeed, students have access to laptops, handheld or mobile technologies that are more powerful and better connected than conventional desktop computers (Guy, 2010). When used in teaching and learning, digital technologies are a powerful pedagogical framing for engaging students in place, across near and distant spaces, and through time - key concepts in geographical education. Millington (2015) emphasises the need for active engaged learning which requires the student to be at the centre of their learning, and which can be facilitated through the use of educational technologies. Teachers, students, technology and the learning environment are in effect supporting pillars and players to facilitate active learning, which will enable and empower the learner. When attempting to incorporate educational technologies into the geography classroom the use needs to be more directed, working towards a particular pedagogical goal as technology for the sake of technology may act as a confounding agent towards student learning.

One to two paper sessions are planned to address these pedagogical issues. We encourage papers that focus on instructor experiences with technology and critically reflect on the associated challenges as well as benefits of technology use. Questions might include, but are not limited to:

Does technology enhance student engagement in learning and the learning community or does it contribute to alienation and separation?
Do mobile technologies have something special to offer geography education? Does Geography have something to offer mobile technology?
Do new educational technologies reinforce or challenge conventional inequalities in the classroom, for example, related to gender or ethnicity?


Description

What are the pedagogical dos and don’ts in geographical education when it comes to technology? How should pedagogical framing influence our use of educational technologies? This session will explore these and related questions. The growing deployment of emerging educational technologies among higher education institutions, and within geography departments, raises many questions. The interdisciplinarity and geospatial nature of the discipline of Geography may position it well to lead in these endeavours, but this must be done reflectively and through active engaged learning.

We are in the age of ubiquitous computing where information and communication technologies have become firmly embedded in everyday life (Mehigan and Pitt, 2010) and with this comes an expectancy for researchers and educators to keep up with the pace of technology advancement (Traxler and Wishart 2011). Indeed, students have access to laptops, handheld or mobile technologies that are more powerful and better connected than conventional desktop computers (Guy, 2010). When used in teaching and learning, digital technologies are a powerful pedagogical framing for engaging students in place, across near and distant spaces, and through time - key concepts in geographical education. Millington (2015) emphasises the need for active engaged learning which requires the student to be at the centre of their learning, and which can be facilitated through the use of educational technologies. Teachers, students, technology and the learning environment are in effect supporting pillars and players to facilitate active learning, which will enable and empower the learner. When attempting to incorporate educational technologies into the geography classroom the use needs to be more directed, working towards a particular pedagogical goal as technology for the sake of technology may act as a confounding agent towards student learning.

One to two paper sessions are planned to address these pedagogical issues. We encourage papers that focus on instructor experiences with technology and critically reflect on the associated challenges as well as benefits of technology use. Questions might include, but are not limited to:

Does technology enhance student engagement in learning and the learning community or does it contribute to alienation and separation?
Do mobile technologies have something special to offer geography education? Does Geography have something to offer mobile technology?
Do new educational technologies reinforce or challenge conventional inequalities in the classroom, for example, related to gender or ethnicity?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Ricardo Nogueira*, Georgia State University, Using Technology to Enhance Students’ Engagement in a Large Classroom 20 8:00 AM
Presenter Amber Ignatius*, University of North Georgia, Application of Geospatial Technologies in Higher Education: Promoting Interactive Experiential Learning 20 8:20 AM
Presenter Nina Hewitt*, University of British Columbia, Ecosystem Education with Augmented Reality: Value-Added Learning or Student Disengagement? 20 8:40 AM
Discussant Siobhán Mcphee University of British Columbia 20 9:00 AM
Presenter Aaron Adams*, New Mexico State University, A Comparative Usability Assessment of Augmented Reality 3-D Printed Terrain Models and 2-D Topographic Maps 20 9:20 AM

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