Migration policies: illegalization and criminalization of bodies, solidarity and practices of resistance I

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Socialist and Critical Geography Specialty Group, Political Geography Specialty Group, Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 1:10 PM / 2:50 PM
Room: 8201, Park Tower Suites, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Pierpaolo Mudu, Sutapa Chattopadhyay
Chairs: Salvatore Engel-Di Mauro

Call for Submissions

This session is interested in exploring which set of spaces of resistance and solidarity are operating and can offer innovative solutions againstto the construction of illegalized migration. We welcome papers from radical scholars, independent researchers, students and activists. Papers may focus on any aspect of the struggles that see migrants as active subjects, including but not limited to addressing a set of questions that deserve systematic analysis and represent research and action directions. How can we re-conceptualize the terms solidarity and tolerance and their use in analysis and discourses? What examples can be cited as emblematic to evaluate the effectiveness of these movements and their impact on parties and policies? For example, which repertoire of contention is used in building solidarity between by and with migrants? How important are struggles around borders discourses? Which autonomy can be guaranteed in radical struggles that see migrants coalesced with various heterogeneous political subjects?


Description

The US and the European democratic countries have accelerated criminalization, segregation and deportation policies to erase, with any mean, the political role of migrants and those who do not accept securitization policies. The scale of segregation, encampment and detention of migrants is increasing.
Bordering, policing and humanitarian assistance are designing the new hegemonic framework that has shifted toward widespread repression of social control. Autonomy of migration is one of the main target of securitization policies that put together neoliberals and post-fascists.

At the same time solidarity movements and actions by individuals are being reorganizing and are constantly under attack in particular by the apparent “tension” between neoliberal parties and forces that are strongly advocating post-fascist regimes. Post-fascist parties and coalitions are eager to completing the job started by neoliberal parties and when they are ruling, such as in Hungary, Italy and the USA they offer sound examples of their policies against any form of solidarity. The social repression that they advocate is stretched to the extreme and the industrial prison system is put in a strict “dialogue” with the migration industrial system and the humanitarian industrial system. At different scales, social forces and institutions wage a fluid war against global south countries and their migrants that are not “good and useful” as they should be. Solidarity cannot be tolerated in democracies. But, for example, radical spaces of resistance, such as the ones originated by squatting, are still created and the acceptance of a suffocating social order is challenged.

This session is interested in exploring which set of spaces of resistance and solidarity are operating and can offer innovative solutions against the construction of illegalized migration. We welcome papers from radical scholars, independent researchers, students and activists. Papers may focus on any aspect of the struggles that see migrants as active subjects, including but not limited to addressing a set of questions that deserve systematic analysis and represent research and action directions. How can we re-conceptualize the terms solidarity and tolerance and their use in analysis and discourses? What examples can be cited as emblematic to evaluate the effectiveness of these movements and their impact on parties and policies? For example, which repertoire of contention is used in building solidarity between by and with migrants? How important are struggles around borders discourses? Which autonomy can be guaranteed in radical struggles that see migrants coalesced with various heterogeneous political subjects?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Introduction Ayushman Bhagat University of Durham 20 1:10 PM
Presenter Melora Koepke*, Simon Fraser University, Tactics for the unthinkable: Crisis and care at the crossroads of the "European migration crisis” 20 1:30 PM
Presenter Romain Filhol*, Université Paris Est, Struggling for legal documents or fighting to improve work conditions? Comparison between two movements struggling for the rights of migrant workers in Southern Italy 20 1:50 PM
Presenter Pierpaolo Mudu*, University of Washington - Tacoma, Deanna Dadusc, University of Brighton, Opposing the Criminalization of Migrants and Solidarity: Ideas and Practices 20 2:10 PM
Discussant James Tyner Kent State University 20 2:30 PM

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