Fire-driven vegetation change 2

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Biogeography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM
Room: Regency Ballroom, Omni, West
Organizers: Lucas Harris, Alan Taylor, Anthony Zhao
Chairs: Anthony Zhao

Call for Submissions

The goal of this session is to explore the role of fire in initiating and maintaining vegetation change, and how this role varies among different ecosystems and plant communities worldwide. We welcome presentations which explore aspects of fire-vegetation-climate interactions, the drivers of post-fire vegetation recovery, and the past, present and/or future of vegetation dynamics in fire-prone landscapes. If you are interested in participating in this session please contact Lucas Harris (lbh146@psu.edu).


Description

Plant species distributions and abundances are often described in relation to climate, soils and topography. However, fire may trigger vegetation change and may also maintain altered vegetation compositions and structures through interactions between fire, vegetation and climate.

Increasing area burned and area burned at high severity observed in different ecosystems worldwide over the past 30 years raises the possibility of fire emerging as an increasingly influential driver of vegetation change at a range of spatial scales. Factors like regional warming and drying and fuel buildup from fire suppression or land use change are changing fire severity and frequency. In many areas invasive species are further altering fire regimes, often reinforcing novel plant communities. Against this backdrop of altered fuels and climate, changing patterns of human ignitions are affecting what gets burned and when.

Trajectories of vegetation recovery following fires are changing too, especially given unusual fire severity patterns, changes in water stress and water availability, and the presence of invasive species. The drivers of fire severity and frequency as well as post-fire vegetation recovery are complex, and interactions among these drivers produce sometimes unexpected vegetation change. Considering the legacy effects of past land use and fire history are often critical to understanding current vegetation composition and structure. Likewise, an understanding of how plant communities are responding to climate and land use change is critical to anticipating future change.

The goal of this session is to explore the role of fire in initiating and maintaining vegetation change, and how this role varies among different ecosystems and plant communities worldwide. Presentations are welcome which explore aspects of fire-vegetation-climate interactions, the drivers of post-fire vegetation recovery, and the past, present and/or future of vegetation dynamics in fire-prone landscapes.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Scott Markwith*, Florida Atlantic University, Asha Paudel, Florida Atlantic University, Michelle Coppoletta, US Forest Service, Kyle Merriam, US Forest Service, Brandon Collins, US Forest Service, Successive large mixed-severity wildfires and vegetation and fuel dynamics in the Sierra Nevada, CA 20 9:55 AM
Presenter John Sakulich*, Regis University, Alan H. Taylor, Pennsylvania State University, Effects of wildfire on stand structure and composition in Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas 20 10:15 AM
Presenter Anthony Zhao*, The Pennsylvania State University, Modeling Prescribed Fire Effects on Vegetation Dynamics in Pitch Pine and Mixed-Oak Forests 20 10:35 AM
Presenter Andrew M Barton*, University of Maine - Farmington, Helen M. Poulos, Wesleyan University, Vegetation change in Arizona Madrean pine-oak forests following high-severity wildfire: patterns and mechanisms 20 10:55 AM
Presenter Mark Cochrane*, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Izaya Numata, South Dakota State University, Sonaira S. Silva, Federal University of Acre, Vegetation outcomes from altered fire regimes: insights from tropical forests 20 11:15 AM

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