Geography, Substance Use, and Addiction

Type: Paper
Theme: Geography, GIScience and Health: Building an International Geospatial Health Research Network (IGHRN)
Sponsor Groups: Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: Tyler, Marriott, Mezzanine Level
Organizers: Jeremy Mennis, Kathleen Stewart
Chairs: Jeremy Mennis

Call for Submissions

The use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs represents one of the greatest threats to public health in the US and worldwide. This session brings together researchers who are interested in geographic topics relating to substance use and addiction, including, for example:

* Spatial or spatiotemporal patterns of substance use and substance use disorders
* Geographic aspects of substance use prevention and interventions
* Geographic aspects of substance use disorder treatment, relapse, or recovery
* Place effects on substance use behaviors
* The intersection of spatial and social factors in substance use
* New data sources for analyzing substance use, including crowdsourcing, social media, and big data
* Quantitative spatial, longitudinal, and geostatistical techniques for investigating substance use
* Qualitative techniques for investigating substance use

Other related topics are also welcome. To apply, register and submit your abstract (250 words maximum) online following the AAG guidelines. Then send your abstracts and PIN number to Jeremy Mennis (jmennis@temple.edu) and Kathleen Stewart (stewartk@umd.edu) by October 19, 2019.

This session will be part of the AAG 2018 Special Theme on Geography, GIScience, and Health. Sponsored by the Health and Medical Geography, Spatial Analysis and Modeling, and the Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Groups


Description

Addiction is a chronic disease of the brain that can alter cognitive functioning, mood, and behavior, with negative effects on multiple health outcomes. Substance use disorders involving tobacco, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs represent one of the largest threats to public health worldwide. The United States is no exception, where legalization in many states has rapidly changed the accessibility to, and social norms around, cannabis, and the nation faces a rapidly accelerating crisis concerning addiction to opioids, including heroin, fentanyl, and prescription painkillers. This session brings together researchers who are interested in geographic topics relating to substance use and addiction.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Kathleen Stewart*, University of Maryland - College Park, Yanjia Cao, University of Maryland, Eric Wish, University of Maryland, Eleanor Artigiani, University of Maryland, Designing a composite index for spatial access to substance use disorder treatment and emergency medical services in New Hampshire 20 3:05 PM
Presenter Sean G Young*, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Corey J Hayes, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Jonathan Aram, University of Maryland, Mark Tait, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Doctor Shopping and Doctor Hopping: Spatial Analysis of Patient Travel for Prescription Opioids 20 3:25 PM
Presenter Harvey Miller*, The Ohio State University, Ayaz Hyder, The Ohio State University, Ashley Dundon, The Ohio State University, Gretchen Hammond, Mighty Crow Media, Jinhyung Lee, The Ohio State University, Adam Porr, The Ohio State University, Lauren T. Southerland, The Ohio State University, Opioid Recovery Deserts: Geographical mismatch between need for opioid use disorder recovery services and access to care 20 3:45 PM
Presenter Megan Davies*, , Nathaniel Lewis, University of Southampton, Graham Moon, University of Southampton, Trends in smoking prevalence over time: A comparison between LGB and heterosexual populations using multilevel growth modelling 20 4:05 PM
Presenter Jeremy Mennis*, Temple University, Gerald Stahler, Temple University, Does Marijuana Legalization Lead to Increased Cannabis Use Disorder among Adolescents? 20 4:25 PM

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