Methods and Motivations for Measuring Spatial Inequality & Socioeconomic Mobility I

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: Forum Room, Omni, West
Organizers: Wei Kang, Marynia Kolak
Chairs: Wei Kang

Call for Submissions

The spatial dimension of social inequality and mobility has attracted scholarly and policy attention in recent years. Social inequality is concerned with the uneven distribution of an important socioeconomic variable, such as race, gender, income or accessibility to health, food and other public services. Spatial inequality manifests itself if the distribution is spatially uneven and could have significant regional and local policy implications. The magnitude of spatial inequality can vary across spatial scales and may depend on how observations are delineated. Aside from a static view of the spatial distribution, the change over time or generations is also of critical importance. The measure of mobility serves as a complement to the inequality measure to reveal a fuller picture of the socioeconomic phenomena and could potentially shed light on the inequality status in the future.

We welcome papers focusing on topics including, but not limited to:
* Global, regional and local measures of spatial inequality & mobility
* Multiscalar perspective on spatial inequality & mobility
* Normative evaluation of spatial inequality & mobility
* Relationship between social inequality & mobility and its spatial dimension
* Theoretical development of spatial inequality & mobility
* Neighborhood conceptualization and delineation
* Empirical studies on determinants of spatial inequality
* Methods quantifying the impacts of underlying inequalities on health, economic, or other outcomes
* Conceptual models across disparate research approaches that seek to map or update complex pathways that drive and/or reinforce inequalities
* Measuring spatial distribution of social determinants of health for clinical or policy audiences
* Quantitative approaches such as computational modeling, simulations, or quasi-experimental techniques to test equality-boosting policy approaches and interventions

Committee: Luc Anselin, Sergio Rey, Emily Talen, Chris Fowler

Please submit your abstract at the AAG 2019 conference portal and forward the submission confirmation email to Marynia Kolak (mkolak@uchicago.edu) and Wei Kang (weikang@ucr.edu) by Oct 30, 2018. We look forward to meeting you in Washington D.C. in 2019! This session is hosted in conjunction with the University of Chicago Center for Spatial Data Science and the University of California, Riverside Center for Geospatial Sciences.


Description

The spatial dimension of social inequality and mobility has attracted scholarly and policy attention in recent years. Social inequality is concerned with the uneven distribution of an important socioeconomic variable, such as race, gender, income or accessibility to health, food and other public services. Spatial inequality manifests itself if the distribution is spatially uneven and could have significant regional and local policy implications. The magnitude of spatial inequality can vary across spatial scales and may depend on how observations are delineated. Aside from a static view of the spatial distribution, the change over time or generations is also of critical importance. The measure of mobility serves as a complement to the inequality measure to reveal a fuller picture of the socioeconomic phenomena and could potentially shed light on the inequality status in the future.

Organizers: Wei Kang and Marynia Kolak
Committee: Luc Anselin, Sergio Rey, Emily Talen, Chris Fowler


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter David Folch*, Florida State University, Matthew Laird, Florida State University, Measuring Multidimensional Poverty in the United States 20 3:05 PM
Presenter Daniel Griffith*, U. of Texas at Dallas, Yongwan Chun, University of Texas at Dallas, Jan Hauke, Adam Mickiewicz University, A Moran eigenvector spatial filtering specification of spatial entropy 20 3:25 PM
Presenter William Clark*, University of California - Los Angeles, Julian Randon-Furling, University of Paris 1, Pantheon, Madalina Olteanu, University of Paris 1, Pantheon, A New Method for Analyzing Ethnic Mixing: Southern California as an Exemplar 20 3:45 PM
Presenter Renan Cortes*, University of California, Riverside, Serge Rey, University of California, Riverside, Building an open-source framework for non-Spatial and Spatial Segregation measures 20 4:05 PM
Presenter Marynia Kolak*, University of Chicago, Quantifying Neighborhood-Level Social Determinants of Health in the Continental United States: A Multivariate Small-Area Analysis 20 4:25 PM

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