Pushing the Boundaries of Regional Infrastructure: The Washington DC Region in Focus

Type: Panel
Theme:
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Poster #:
Day: 4/6/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: 8217, Park Tower Suites, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Jen Nelles, Michael Glass
Chairs: Michael Glass

Call for Submissions

We are looking for panelists, preferably with an interest in the D.C. metropolitan region, to discuss how we study, and thus produce knowledge of, infrastructure: how are decisions on infrastructures are made, and what are their impacts on communities? What types of infrastructure are more amenable to/successful at the regional scale? How do infrastructure issues shape regional imaginaries and interpolate regional political subjects? This panel will situate and problematize key questions and concepts by interrogating regional infrastructures in the large and complex D.C. metropolitan region. The conference location offers a fascinating and unique opportunity to use the metropolitan region’s rich experience and varied assets – from ports and multi-state local transport through mega-project financing and governance to environmental infrastructures under climate change – as a springboard to examine the intersection of infrastructure and regional studies. Panelists include scholars and practitioners who work on questions of infrastructure and governance in the D.C. area and Northeast Corridor. They will offer diverse perspectives on a series of questions that challenge preconceptions about the practice and theory of the infrastructures which constitute U.S. city-regions. The panel will anchor their remarks using specific examples from the DC region, but also reflect on the case of DC to open a broader interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral dialogue on how the funding, governance, and spatiality of infrastructure can promote urban, economic, and ecological sustainability at the regional scale.


Description

This colloquy provides an advance introduction to the Regional Studies Association Research Network on Infrastructural Regionalism (NOIR) that is scheduled to launch in late-2019. NOIR is fundamentally concerned with exploring how we study, and thus produce knowledge of, infrastructure: how are decisions on infrastructures are made, and what are their impacts on communities? What types of infrastructure are more amenable to/successful at the regional scale? How do infrastructure issues shape regional imaginaries and interpolate regional political subjects? This panel will situate and problematize the Network’s key questions and concepts by interrogating regional infrastructures in the large and complex DC metropolitan region. The conference location offers a fascinating and unique opportunity to use the metropolitan region’s rich experience and varied assets – from ports and multi-state local transport through mega-project financing and governance to environmental infrastructures under climate change – as a springboard to examine the intersection of infrastructure and regional studies. Panelists include scholars and practitioners who work on questions of infrastructure and governance in the DC area and Northeast Corridor. They will offer diverse perspectives on a series of questions that challenge preconceptions about the practice and theory of the infrastructures which constitute U.S. city-regions. The panel will anchor their remarks using specific examples from the DC region, but also reflect on the case of DC to open a broader interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral dialogue on how the funding, governance, and spatiality of infrastructure can promote urban, economic, and ecological sustainability at the regional scale.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes
Panelist Chuck Bean Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments 15
Panelist Joseph Kane Brookings 15
Panelist Ian MacFarlane EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., PBC 15
Panelist Leah Meisterlin Columbia University 15

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