Camps, Checkpoints and Border Fortifications: Critical Geographies of Containment, (Im)Mobility and Security II

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Political Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/3/2019
Start / End Time: 4:30 PM / 6:10 PM
Room: Virginia A, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Alexandra Rijke, Yolanda Weima, Hanno Brankamp
Chairs: Alexandra Rijke

Call for Submissions

In these panels, we want to critically unpack different meanings, discourses, and practices of (in)security in camps, militarized borders and other spaces designed to contain people on the move. We wish to analyse the intricate assemblages and spatialities of control that are exemplary of the everyday security practices involved in controlling the movement of the ‘unwanted’, where containment, (in)security and porosity are intrinsically linked. By focusing on the bio-political technologies involved in this control such as camps, checkpoints and other border fortifications, we want to critically unpack the workings of these technologies and the diverse way the people affected incorporate, manipulate, twist and possibly reject in diverse ways their materialities, practices, and biopolitical technologies.

Discussants: Reece Jones (University of Hawaii) and Claudio Minca (Macquarie University)

For this panel, we invite submissions on the following themes/topics:
• Securitization and militarization of aid, borders, etc.
• Relational, experiential and ontological approaches to (in)security
• Walling and b/ordering practices
• Daily geographies of militarized (border) checkpoints
• Geopolitics of encampment
• Camps and the nation-state
• Refugee agency in/and security
• Crime and criminalisation in/of camps

Please send abstracts (max: 250 words) to the organizers by 20 October 2018.

Organizers:
Hanno Brankamp (University of Oxford) hanno.brankamp@ouce.ox.ac.uk
Alexandra Rijke (Wageningen University and Research) alexandra.rijke@wur.nl
Yolanda Weima (York University) weima@yorku.ca


Description

Globally, the scale of encampment and containment of people on the move is receiving increasing critical attention. Establishing and maintaining camps, border fortifications and other spaces of exception is typically justified, in one way or another, by referring to (in)security. Hegemonic discourses among practitioners, policy-makers, and scholars of international relations (IR), forced migration studies or geopolitics, tend to construct and sustain problematic subjectivities of people ‘on the move’ that are predicated on a contradictory duality: where refugees are either presented as 'innocent victims' who lack agency and are in need of protection in camps, their mobility is also equated with criminality, the smuggling of drugs and/or weapons, and terrorist threats.

Geographers have addressed the manifold ways in which dominant discourses of security are deployed to simultaneously justify 'protective custody' and containment, troubling state-centric (and camp-centric) notions of security, and theorizing security broadly and relationally across scales, through concepts such as "ontological insecurity" (Katz, 2007; Hyndman & Giles 2017; Butler 2004; Ramadan 2011; Mountz 2010, Jones 2012). In the same vein, little critical research focuses empirically on everyday security practices and their spatial enactment.

In these two panels, we want to critically unpack different meanings, discourses, and practices of (in)security in camps, militarized borders and other spaces designed to contain people on the move. We wish to analyse the intricate assemblages and spatialities of control that are exemplary of the everyday security practices involved in controlling the movement of the ‘unwanted’, where containment, (in)security and porosity are intrinsically linked. By focusing on the bio-political technologies involved in this control such as camps, checkpoints and other border fortifications, we want to critically unpack the workings of these technologies and the diverse way the people affected incorporate, manipulate, twist and possibly reject in diverse ways their materialities, practices, and biopolitical technologies.

Discussants: Reece Jones (University of Hawaii) and Claudio Minca (Macquarie University)


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Lauren Martin*, Durham University, Carceral Economies of Contemporary Migration Control 20 4:30 PM
Presenter Anna Casaglia*, University of Trento, From everyday bordering to everyday containment: the shifting border regime of the Mediterranean. 20 4:50 PM
Presenter Yolanda Weima*, York University, Haunting closures: Sovereign power, camp closures, and fear in everyday life 20 5:10 PM
Presenter Rebecca Clouser*, Washington University in St. Louis, Jillian M. Rickly, University of Nottingham, Endurance philanthropists and migrant caravans: Portrayals of fear and (im)mobilities 20 5:30 PM
Discussant Claudio Minca Macquarie University 20 5:50 PM

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