Reproduction and deconstruction – on the struggle with hegemonies in spaces

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:40 AM (MDT)
Room: Marshall West, Marriott, Mezzanine Level
Organizers: Michael Lehner, Jana Pokraka
Chairs: Jana Pokraka

Call for Submissions

Spaces are social, respectively societal, constructions; This is a very common and profound idea, stated by several spatial theories in social geography (a.o. Lefebvre 1993; Werlen 1993; Massey 1998). The social construction of spaces is an everyday struggle for the dominance of a certain meaning attached to physical matter. Although the construction of meaning is a fluent process that may result in a broad variety of potential spaces, a certain construction’s hegemony (Gramsci 1991) is based on the unequal distribution of power to communicate meanings about space, being heard, and to overrule or even eliminate alternative meanings. However, there are options to challenge spatial hegemonies e.g. through counter mapping approaches (a.o. de Certeau 1988; Ramasubramanian 2010; Elwood & Mitchell 2013).
With this session, we would like to draw the focus on two extremes of the existence of social constructions of spaces: the virtually inalterable persistence of spatial constructions, called naturalization, that constitutes unequal developements and their reproduction in everyday spatial actions and the potential to struggle for counter-hegemonies , to provide alternative frameworks of meaning, or to open a creative, manifold, field of potential constructions towards social freedom, queer equality and transversal solidarity.
This session welcomes contributions from social geography and geography education that help to explain these phenomena and to address them for instance in citizenship education. Furthermore, the session is open to shift the borders of disciplines to include, to name but a few, approaches from social, computational and media sciences and history, too. Examples from urban studies, sustainable development and many more are welcome. The session will include a range of methodological approaches, theoretical as well as empirical work, to illustrate and find evidence for the situation that sometimes spatial constructions seem permanent, but under certain conditions they can be opposed effectively.


Description

Spaces are social, respectively societal, constructions; This is a very common and profound idea, stated by several spatial theories in social geography (a.o. Lefebvre 1993; Werlen 1993; Massey 1998). The social construction of spaces is an everyday struggle for the dominance of a certain meaning attached to physical matter. Although the construction of meaning is a fluent process that may result in a broad variety of potential spaces, a certain construction’s hegemony (Gramsci 1991) is based on the unequal distribution of power to communicate meanings about space, being heard, and to overrule or even eliminate alternative meanings. However, there are options to challenge spatial hegemonies e.g. through counter mapping approaches (a.o. de Certeau 1988; Ramasubramanian 2010; Elwood & Mitchell 2013).
With this session, we would like to draw the focus on two extremes of the existence of social constructions of spaces: the virtually inalterable persistence of spatial constructions, called naturalization, that constitutes unequal developements and their reproduction in everyday spatial actions and the potential to struggle for counter-hegemonies , to provide alternative frameworks of meaning, or to open a creative, manifold, field of potential constructions towards social freedom, queer equality and transversal solidarity.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Jana Pokraka*, University of Duisburg-Essen, Who owns the city? An exploration and reflection of children's (re)production of public spaces 20 8:00 AM
Presenter Ritwika Biswas*, Temple University, “Where to go and not go”- The exclusionary politics of urban spaces in Kolkata 20 8:20 AM
Presenter Marya Hannun*, Georgetown University, “An Oriental Touch”: Afghanistan and the Geographical Imagination of Empire 20 8:40 AM
Presenter Brett Goldberg*, Arizona State University, Architectures of Power: Constructing and Performing Man in a World on Fire 20 9:00 AM
Presenter Michael Lehner*, University of Duisburg-Essen, Jana Pokraka, University of Duisburg-Essen, Inga Gryl, University of Duisburg-Essen, Deconstruction as a method for map-reading (in educational contexts) 20 9:20 AM

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