After the map was made and the drone was flown: Implications of geospatial data for environmental governance

Type: Panel
Theme: Geographies of Human Rights: The Right to Benefit from Scientific Progress
Sponsor Groups: Applied Geography Specialty Group, Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/3/2019
Start / End Time: 12:40 PM / 2:20 PM
Room: Committee Room, Omni, Lobby Level
Organizers: Teresa Bornschlegl
Chairs:

Call for Submissions

Geospatial technologies, such as drones, remote sensing, GPS, and GIS have found increasingly widespread use by social organizations, local communities, and environmental agencies in the context of natural resource extraction-- visuals are said to have a greater impact than 1000 words (Chapin et al 2005; Wainwright & Bryan 2009; Salamanca & Rosario 2012; Cuba et al 2014; Slack 2014). Communities use geospatial technologies to map their territories in defense against extractive concessions and licensing processes and/or to evidence negative environmental impacts of natural resource extraction (Corbett et al 2006, Sletto et al 2013; Emel et al 2014; Radjawali & Pye 2017, Specht 2018). Likewise, environmental agencies increasingly make use of geospatial technologies to monitor and control industries that extract natural resources (Hodge 1997; INECE 2015; Glicksman et al 2016).

However, less is known about what happens subsequently with these geospatial data:
• How, and why (or: why not) do decision-makers, and legal entities take these maps and data visualizations into account?
• Why (or why not) does the use of geospatial data advance the realization of environmental justice in the context of natural resource extraction?
• How to increase the political impact of geospatial data produced by communities and/or environmental agencies regarding the environmental governance of natural resource extraction?

We invite papers and/or panelists of cases in which geospatial data were used to influence decision-making on natural resource extraction to answer these questions. This session is an attempt to contribute to systematizing experiences from which to derive lessons for future strategies of environmental justice advocacy. Possible topics can include but are not limited to uses of geospatial data in, e.g., legal cases, campaigns, environmental oversight, and policy-making.


Description

Geospatial technologies, such as drones, remote sensing, GPS, and GIS have found increasingly widespread use by social organizations, local communities, and environmental agencies in the context of natural resource extraction-- visuals are said to have a greater impact than 1000 words (Chapin et al 2005; Wainwright & Bryan 2009; Salamanca & Rosario 2012; Cuba et al 2014; Slack 2014). Communities use geospatial technologies to map their territories in defense against extractive concessions and licensing processes and/or to evidence negative environmental impacts of natural resource extraction (Corbett et al 2006, Sletto et al 2013; Emel et al 2014; Radjawali & Pye 2017, Specht 2018). Likewise, environmental agencies increasingly make use of geospatial technologies to monitor and control industries that extract natural resources (Hodge 1997; INECE 2015; Glicksman et al 2016).

However, less is known about what happens subsequently with these geospatial data:
• How, and why (or: why not) do decision-makers, and legal entities take these maps and data visualizations into account?
• Why (or why not) does the use of geospatial data advance the realization of environmental justice in the context of natural resource extraction?
• How to increase the political impact of geospatial data produced by communities and/or environmental agencies regarding the environmental governance of natural resource extraction?

We invite papers and/or panelists of cases in which geospatial data were used to influence decision-making on natural resource extraction to answer these questions. This session is an attempt to contribute to systematizing experiences from which to derive lessons for future strategies of environmental justice advocacy. Possible topics can include but are not limited to uses of geospatial data in, e.g., legal cases, campaigns, environmental oversight, and policy-making.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes
Panelist Robert Vos University of Southern California 15
Panelist ALEXANDRA LAMINA 15
Panelist Kirk Jalbert Arizona State University 15
Panelist Sarah Kelly Research Center for Integrated Disaster Risk Management 15

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