Decolonial learning and teaching: policy and praxis

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/7/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM (Eastern Standard Time)
Room: Congressional A, Omni, West
Organizers: Marcin Stanek, Grace Garside
Chairs: Grace Garside

Call for Submissions

Indigenous people, decolonial theorists and various activists around the world articulate the need to decolonize contemporary education systems (Grosfoguel 2013, Cupples and Grosfoguel 2018, Bhambra, Gebrial and Nisancioglu 2018, Noxolo 2017, Walsh 2015). Struggles for the decolonization of education are varied and include bringing non-Eurocentric epistemologies and indigenous cosmovisions to the curricula, as well as reconfiguring power relations within classrooms, schools and universities (Daigle and Sundberg 2017). There is also a need to challenge the interpretation of education as a process limited to schooling and rethink our understanding of valued and valid knowledges (Cupples and Glynn 2014). Decolonizing education implies a strong commitment to a fight against institutional and epistemic racism (Tolia Kelly 2017). But how do all of these ideas relate to educational polices? Can such policies support decolonial struggles, or are they only capable of appropriation of non-Eurocentric knowledges for re-colonial purposes? Do educational policies, which seem to take decoloniality seriously, actually translate to genuine decolonial praxis?

In this session we aim to analyse the multiple and complex relations between decolonial ideas, educational policies and the lived experiences of people whose lives are influenced by those policies. Through a close engagement with narratives from a variety of places, we hope to develop a more critical understanding of how decolonial ideas are translated to policies and/or how those policies translate to particular lived experiences. We argue that paying attention to such complexities is essential for building solidarities and more effective decolonisation of our own epistemicaly privileged academic environments.
We welcome geographic and interdisciplinary contributions related to:
- Educational policies which draw on, are (or claim to be) related to decolonial struggles and theories,
- The lived experiences of students and teachers whose everyday lives are influenced by ‘decolonial’ education policies,
- Multiple, contested and negotiated understandings of decolonial education,
- Ethnographic examples of learning and teaching otherwise (with particular focus on policy)
- Dialogues and ruptures between decolonial theory, educational policies and praxis.

Please e-mail abstracts (max. 250 words) to either to Grace Garside (grace.e.garside@durham.ac.uk) or Marcin Stanek (marcin.b.stanek@durham.ac.uk) by October 18th 2018. We also welcome alternative forms of presentations, e.g. art, music, dance etc. (e-mail information if abstracts are inappropriate).

Bibliography
Bhambra, G., Gebrial, G. and Nisancioglu, K. (2018) Decolonizing the University. London: Pluto Press.
Cupples, J. and Glynn, K. (2014) Indigenizing and decolonizing higher education on Nicaragua’s Atlantic Coast. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 35(1): 56-71
Cupples, J. and Grosfoguel, R. (2018) Unsettling Eurocentrism in the Westernized University. London: Routledge.
Daigle, M. and Sundberg, J. (2017) From where we stand: unsettling geographical knowledges in the classroom. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 42: 338 – 341.

Grosfoguel, R. (2013) The Structure of Knowledge in Westernized Universities: Epistemic Racism/Sexism and the Four Genocides/Epistemicides of the Long 16th Century, Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge: 11 (1), pp. 73-90.
Noxolo, P. (2017) Introduction: Decolonising geographical knowledge in a colonised and re‐colonising postcolonial world. Area 49 (3), pp. 317 – 319.

Tolia Kelly, D. (2017) A day in the life of a Geographer: ‘lone’, black, female. Area 49 (3), pp. 324-328.

Walsh, C. (2015) Decolonial pedagogies walking and asking. Notes to Paulo Freire from AbyaYala. International Journal of Lifelong Education 34 (1), pp. 9 – 21.


Description

Indigenous people, decolonial theorists and various activists around the world articulate the need to decolonize contemporary education systems (Grosfoguel 2013, Cupples and Grosfoguel 2018, Bhambra, Gebrial and Nisancioglu 2018, Noxolo 2017, Walsh 2015). Struggles for the decolonization of education are varied and include bringing non-Eurocentric epistemologies and indigenous cosmovisions to the curricula, as well as reconfiguring power relations within classrooms, schools and universities (Daigle and Sundberg 2017). There is also a need to challenge the interpretation of education as a process limited to schooling and rethink our understanding of valued and valid knowledges (Cupples and Glynn 2014). Decolonizing education implies a strong commitment to a fight against institutional and epistemic racism (Tolia Kelly 2017). But how do all of these ideas relate to educational polices? Can such policies support decolonial struggles, or are they only capable of appropriation of non-Eurocentric knowledges for re-colonial purposes? Do educational policies, which seem to take decoloniality seriously, actually translate to genuine decolonial praxis?

In this session we aim to analyse the multiple and complex relations between decolonial ideas, educational policies and the lived experiences of people whose lives are influenced by those policies. Through a close engagement with narratives from a variety of places, we hope to develop a more critical understanding of how decolonial ideas are translated to policies and/or how those policies translate to particular lived experiences. We argue that paying attention to such complexities is essential for building solidarities and more effective decolonisation of our own epistemicaly privileged academic environments. We welcome geographic and interdisciplinary contributions related to:
- Educational policies which draw on, are (or claim to be) related to decolonial struggles and theories,
- The lived experiences of students and teachers whose everyday lives are influenced by ‘decolonial’ education policies,
- Multiple, contested and negotiated understandings of decolonial education,
- Ethnographic examples of learning and teaching otherwise (with particular focus on policy)
- Dialogues and ruptures between decolonial theory, educational policies and praxis.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Grace Garside*, , Creating Educational Utopias: Interculturality, ‘Re-indigenization’ and the Pluriverse 20 9:55 AM
Presenter A.C Quinn*, , Pedagogies of Solidarity: learning and teaching otherwise 20 10:15 AM
Presenter Marcin Stanek*, Durham University, Coloniality and decoloniality in Bolivia's Decolonizing Education 20 10:35 AM
Discussant Julie Cupples University of Edinburgh 20 10:55 AM

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