Reinvigorating Imaginaries of Economic Change: Intersections with Gender, Identity, Race, and Sexuality I

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Black Geographies Specialty Group, Socialist and Critical Geography Specialty Group, Economic Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/6/2019
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:45 PM
Room: 8226, Park Tower Suites, Marriott, Lobby Level
Organizers: Kevin St. Martin, Zoe Alexander, Thomas Crowley
Chairs: Kevin St. Martin

Call for Submissions

Critical theories of economy, in economic geography and elsewhere, have long considered a variety of axes of difference and how they determine and shape economic processes across space and in particular places. However, unlike social theories that take as their object of analysis gender, identity, race, or sexuality, critical theories of the economy often avoid cultivating imaginaries or practices aimed at producing change “here and now.”

Theorists of gender, identity, race, and sexuality have developed a rich understanding of change and politics both of which emerge from acknowledging difference and diversity across categories and sites. On the other hand, theorists of the economy struggle to imagine progressive change as proximate or even possible - though there are notable exceptions, particularly the diverse economies perspective pioneered by Gibson-Graham (2006a and 2006b). As a result, even while we are seeing a surge of interest in economic difference, in “alternatives” to the current crisis-ridden capitalist economic system (e.g. alternative food movements, solidarity economies, cooperativism, local currencies, etc.), there remains a surprising absence of theorization or reflection on how such difference might be strategically designed, enacted, made durable and expanded.

We seek papers that draw on the rich traditions noted in the session description to not only “imagine and enact” economic difference but actively link economic transformation to other foci of liberation and justice.

Sample paper topics could include:
• Queer futurities and the economy
• The black radical imagination and critiques of racial capitalism
• Disability studies, mobility justice, and economy
• Solidarity economies across borders
• Feminist political economy
• Diverse economies and community economies
• Practices of revolution and liberation
• Post-revolutionary economies
• Collective liberation and Black Feminist Theory

Interested participants should send expressions of interest, questions and/or an abstract of 250 words (maximum) to Kevin St. Martin (kevin.st.martin@rutgers.edu), Zoe Alexander (zoe.alexander@rutgers.edu), or Thomas Crowley (trc90@geography.rutgers.edu) by Monday, November 5th.


Description

Critical theories of economy, in economic geography and elsewhere, have long considered a variety of axes of difference and how they determine and shape economic processes across space and in particular places. However, unlike social theories that take as their object of analysis gender, identity, race, or sexuality, critical theories of the economy often avoid cultivating imaginaries or practices aimed at producing change “here and now.”

Theorists of gender, identity, race, and sexuality have developed a rich understanding of change and politics both of which emerge from acknowledging difference and diversity across categories and sites. For instance, Cedric Robinson’s (1983) seminal critique of racial capitalism also foregrounds the transformative, liberatory effects of the black radical tradition. More recent work on the connections between the black experience and economic cooperatives have been explored by Gordon Nembhard (2014) and Hossein (2016). Queer theorists (see especially Muñoz) have developed an effective politics of subversive utopianism that calls for the “queering” of social institutions. Multiple generations of feminists have deepened and rearticulated their historic commitment to an embodied, ethical politics of change.

On the other hand, theorists of the economy struggle to imagine progressive change as proximate or even possible - though there are notable exceptions, particularly the diverse economies perspective pioneered by Gibson-Graham (2006a and 2006b). As a result, even while we are seeing a surge of interest in economic difference, in “alternatives” to the current crisis-ridden capitalist economic system (e.g. alternative food movements, solidarity economies, cooperativism, local currencies, etc.), there remains a surprising absence of theorization or reflection on how such difference might be strategically designed, enacted, made durable and expanded.

The papers in this session will draw on the rich traditions noted above to not only “imagine and enact” economic difference but actively link economic transformation to other foci of liberation and justice.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Leo Hwang*, Greenfield Community College, Reconstructing Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace: Re-Thinking Economies of Difference in Higher Education 20 3:05 PM
Presenter Gregory Brodie*, , Contentious Spaces: Newark, New Jersey and the Port of Newark 20 3:25 PM
Presenter Zoe Alexander*, Rutgers University - Piscataway, NJ, Imaginaries of Nature and the Practice of Transformative Justice 20 3:45 PM
Presenter Kaner Turker*, Clark University, Assembling Community Economies in Northern Kurdistan 20 4:05 PM
Discussant Maliha Safri Drew University, Madison NJ 20 4:25 PM

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