Multispecies Stories of Power and Vulnerability II

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Animal Geography Specialty Group, Cultural Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/4/2019
Start / End Time: 9:55 AM / 11:35 AM
Room: Embassy Room, Omni, East
Organizers: Sharon Wilcox, Stephanie Rutherford
Chairs: Sharon Wilcox

Call for Submissions

Thomas King, Indigenous novelist and academic, asserts that “The truth about stories is that’s all we are…Stories are wonderous things, and they are dangerous” (2003, pp. 2 & 9). The stories that we tell—the manner in which we narrate both human and nonhuman worlds—shape the potential for encounter in fundamental ways. The papers in this session use this insight as their central starting point to explore the ways in which animals are conscripted, enrolled and deployed in shared narratives of power, vulnerability and precarity. In this session, we think about the complicated entanglements among the human registers of race, gender, class and nation, and how these systems of power invoke particular ideas of animality in specific times and places that work to circumscribe the lives of humans and animals alike. We also invite papers that think about how such hum-animal stories can produce shared narratives of vulnerability, which may have to potential to build interspecies solidarity and effect change.

We welcome geographic and interdisciplinary contributions, both theoretical and empirical, that consider:
Storytelling encounter in a more-than-human world
Multispecies intersectionality and environmental justice
Narratives of dehumanization and animality
Stories of becoming animal that work in and through power
Settler colonialism, animality, and nation-building


Description

Thomas King, Indigenous novelist and academic, asserts that “The truth about stories is that’s all we are…Stories are wonderous things, and they are dangerous” (2003, pp. 2 & 9). The stories that we tell—the manner in which we narrate both human and nonhuman worlds—shape the potential for encounter in fundamental ways. The papers in this session use this insight as their central starting point to explore the ways in which animals are conscripted, enrolled and deployed in shared narratives of power, vulnerability and precarity. In this session, we think about the complicated entanglements among the human registers of race, gender, class and nation, and how these systems of power invoke particular ideas of animality in specific times and places that work to circumscribe the lives of humans and animals alike. Papers may also consider how such hum-animal stories can produce shared narratives of vulnerability, which may have to potential to build interspecies solidarity and effect change.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter ILANAH TAVES*, University of Cambridge, The Strange Case of the Croydon Cat Killer: Producing Predators in the Multi-Species Metropolis 20 9:55 AM
Presenter Hannah Fair*, Brunel University London, Orangutans in the Anthropocene: vulnerability, compassion and digital mediation 20 10:15 AM
Presenter Jenny Isaacs*, Rutgers University, “An Epic Journey”; The importance of story for long-distance migratory species conservation 20 10:35 AM
Presenter Heather Rosenfeld*, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Pandora, Regis, and Gromit: Graphic medicine, witnessing, and transforming interspecies relations at farmed animal sanctuaries 20 10:55 AM
Presenter Ariel Rawson*, The Ohio State University, Dysbiotic life: Minding microbes and becoming microbial minds 20 11:15 AM

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