Indigenous Mapping: Contemporary Debates, Methodologies, and Outcomes

Type: Panel
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/3/2019
Start / End Time: 2:35 PM / 4:15 PM
Room: Roosevelt 1, Marriott, Exhibition Level
Organizers: Sibyl Diver
Chairs: Renee Louis

Call for Submissions

Call for Proposals: Indigenous Mapping

For the American Association of Geographers Annual Conference, April 3-7, 2019, Washington, DC https://annualmeeting.aag.org/. Panel sponsored by the AAG Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group.


Long used as a tool for colonial dispossession, mapping has also been used by Indigenous peoples as a tool for reclaiming, reimagining, and renewing Indigenous connections to the land and water, and their traditional territories. Indigenous mapping—or mapping by, with, or for Indigenous peoples—can taken multiple forms.

(1) In political negotiations, traditional use and occupancy maps have been used as court evidence in land settlement claims in Canada (Tobias 2009). Counter-mapping initiatives by community groups and NGOS have challenged resource extraction projects affecting Indigenous territories, presented by government maps as terra nullius (Peluso 1995).

(2) In land-based restoration initiatives, Indigenous mapping has contributed to deeper historical ecology accounts that use archival information to guide contemporary restoration of Indigenous lands, and the renewal of traditional land management practices such as cultural burning (Middleton Manning 2008, Lightfoot et al. 2013); supported Indigenous-led planning and restoration efforts that support longstanding community values for sustainability and self-determination (Diver 2017); and enabled Indigenous communities in the Amazon to collect data linking subsistence use and carbon sequestration (Butt et al. 2015).

(3) In cultural resilience initiatives, Indigenous mapping has supported intergenerational knowledge transfer within communities of songs, stories, place names, in order to reconnect Indigenous peoples to the places where they come from and enable community protection of cultural sites (Hakopa 2011, Pierce & Louis 2008). In addition, Indigenous artists have created maps that sometimes depart from dominant cartographic traditions to reimagine places according to Indigenous community values—lifting up longstanding place connections, current Indigenous land use practices, Indigenous self-determination, and community aspirations for the future (e.g. Sletto 2009a, UW Art Museum).

This panel seeks to locate and connect Indigenous mappers, and those who are interested in the practice, to current debates, methodologies, and outcomes in Indigenous mapping. The panel recognizes that Indigenous mapping has been rightfully critiqued for unethical research practices that can endanger the very Indigenous communities that the research is intending to support (Johnson et al. 2006, Bryan 2009, Louis & Grossman 2009). Another area of concern includes challenges with transferring oral traditions and customary law to single, static, written accounts (Sletto 2009b). Indigenous mapping also raises distinct challenges that involve cultural appropriation, and the protection of Indigenous intellectual and cultural properties. Thus, discussions around following appropriate Indigenous research protocols governing collaborative research, representation, and data sharing (e.g. Pearce 2014, First Nations Principles of OCAP, IPinCH) are an important topic for the panel.

Panel organizers encourage any and all abstracts on Indigenous mapping. This includes abstracts that discuss current challenges and Indigenous responses to contemporary or historic mapping initiatives. For example, who is doing (and paying for) Indigenous mapping, and what are the outcomes for Indigenous communities? What have we learned from the past, and how are current mapping initiatives incorporating Indigenous methodologies that support decolonizing projects, such as Indigenous resilience, resurgence, restoration, and renewal (e.g. Smith 2013)? What kind of mapping is being conducted by Indigenous communities themselves within their own communities? And how are Indigenous mappers within academia incorporating Indigenous research protocols (e.g. First Nations Principles of OCAP) into their community collaborations?

To participate:
Please contact panel organizers with any questions at sdiver@stanford.edu and pualani@ku.edu. To submit your proposal for this panel, load your title and abstract, conforming to AAG annual meeting guidelines, to the AAG conference website (www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers) and then forward the title and abstract for your paper and your PIN, to Sibyl Diver (sdiver@stanford.edu) and Renee Pualani Louis (pualani@ku.edu) by the Symposium deadline of October 19. Please note that this is before the AAG abstract deadline. Please indicate which of the symposium themes your paper is most suited to. If you are interested in serving on a panel, let us know by the same deadline. We will get back to you by October 22 with more information. Thank you for your work and interest!

References Cited:
Bryan, J. (2009). Where would we be without them? Knowledge, space and power in indigenous politics. Futures, 41(1), 24–32.

Butt, N., Epps, K., Overman, H., Iwamura, T., & Fragoso, J. M. (2015). Assessing carbon stocks using indigenous peoples’ field measurements in Amazonian Guyana. Forest Ecology and Management, 338, 191-199.

Diver, S. (2017). Negotiating Indigenous knowledge at the science-policy interface: Insights from the Xáxli’p Community Forest. Environmental Science & Policy, 73, 1-11.

First Nations Principles of OCAP. https://fnigc.ca/ocapr.html

Middleton Manning, B. R. (2018). Upstream: Trust Lands and Power on the Feather River. University of Arizona Press.

Peluso, N. L. (1995). Whose woods are these? Counter‐mapping forest territories in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Antipode, 27(4), 383-406.
Hakopa, H. (2011). The Paepae: Spatial information technologies and the geography of narratives. University of Otago.

IPinCh. Intellectual Prperty Issues in Cultural Heritage. https://www.sfu.ca/ipinch/I
J.T. Johnston, R.P. Louis, A.H. Pramono, Facing the future: encouraging critical cartographic literacies in Inidgenous commmunities, ACME 4 (2006) 80–98.

Lightfoot, K. G., Cuthrell, R. Q., Striplen, C. J., & Hylkema, M. G. (2013). Rethinking the study of landscape management practices among hunter-gatherers in North America. American Antiquity, 78(2), 285-301.

Pearce, M., & Louis, R. (2008). Mapping indigenous depth of place. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 32(3), 107-126.

Pearce, Margaret Wickens (2014) The Last Piece Is You, The Cartographic Journal, 51:2, 107-122.

Sletto, B. I. "“We Drew What We Imagined” Participatory Mapping, Performance, and the Arts of Landscape Making," Current Anthropology 50, no. 4 (August 2009b): 443-476.

Sletto, B. (2009b). Indigenous people don't have boundaries': reborderings, fire management, and productions of authenticities in indigenous landscapes. cultural geographies, 16(2), 253-277.

Smith, L. T. (2013). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. Zed Books Ltd.

Tobias, T. N. (2009). Living proof: the essential data-collection guide for indigenous use-and-occupancy map surveys. Vancouver: Ecotrust Canada


Description

This panel seeks to locate and connect Indigenous mappers, and those
who are interested in the practice, to discuss contemporary debates,
methodologies, and outcomes in Indigenous mapping. Mapping has long
used as a tool for colonial dispossession. However, Indigenous peoples
are also using mapping as a tool for reclaiming, reimagining, and
renewing Indigenous connections to the land and water, and their
traditional territories. Indigenous mapping—or mapping by, with, or
for Indigenous peoples—can take multiple forms. Examples include
traditional use and occupancy maps (Tobais 2009), counter-mapping by
Indigenous communities (Peluso 1995), land-based restoration and
repossession initiatives (Diver 2017, Lightfoot et al. 2013, Middleton
Manning 2008, 2018), mapping narratives or storytelling that conveys
cultural relationships (Caquard 2013, Palmer & Feyerherm 2017), as
well as mapping for intergenerational knowledge transfer and cultural
resurgence (Hakopa 2011, Pearce & Louis 2008).

Panel members will discuss their work, and key issues in Indigenous
mapping. This includes, who is doing (and paying for) Indigenous
mapping, and what are the outcomes for Indigenous communities? What
have we learned from the past, and how are current mapping initiatives
incorporating Indigenous methodologies that support decolonizing
projects? What kind of mapping is being conducted by Indigenous
communities themselves within their own communities? And how are
Indigenous mappers within academia incorporating Indigenous research
protocols (e.g. First Nations Principles of OCAP) into their community
collaborations?

Panelists include:

Renee Pualani Louis, Institute of Policy and Social Research
University of Kansas

Mark Palmer, Geography, University of Missouri

Hauiti Hakopa, Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Otago

Sébastien Caquard, Concordia University & Member of the Mappingback Collective

Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators, Ltd. & Te Runanganui o Ngati Hikairo


Agenda

Type Details Minutes
Panelist Renee Louis Institute of Policy and Social Research 20
Panelist Sebastien Caquard Concordia University 20
Panelist Moka Apiti Digital Navigators Ltd 20
Panelist Mark Palmer University of Missouri-Columbia 20

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