Landscapes, Food and Diet Quality

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/5/2019
Start / End Time: 5:00 PM / 6:40 PM
Room: Governor's Room, Omni, East
Organizers: Bronwen Powell, Erica Smithwick
Chairs: Erica Smithwick

Call for Submissions

Seeking papers for our session "Landscapes, Food Security and Diet Quality".

SUMMARY:
Landscapes around the world are changing rapidly, and land use policy makers are faced with competing demands and limited evidence on which to base decisions. Many conservationists argue that agricultural intensification will be the best way to conserve biodiversity while providing sufficient food (Balmford et al. 2018, Phalan et al. 2011, ). Yet, in many places “agricultural intensification” has meant increasingly large scale agriculture and a focus on increasing yields of staple crops (Moseley et al. 2015) at the cost of diverse production needed to ensure diet quality. To date very little attention has been paid to the ways land use change and landscape composition and configuration impact diet quality, nutrition and the production of diverse healthy foods.

This session will highlight the ways that landscape structure and change impacts the availability and consumption of healthy foods. Emerging evidence suggests that a large portion of nutritionally important foods are produced on small farms, in diverse agricultural landscapes (Hererro et al. 2017) and that landscapes which include trees and forests are better able to provide a healthy and diverse diet for local people (Ickowitz et al. 2014, Rasolofoson et al. 2018). The production of cheap staple foods has led to rapid change in agricultural landscapes: continuing this trajectory will not likely have a positive impact on either human nutrition or agricultural sustainability.

If you are interested in joining us and think your material is a good fit, please email your Abstract and PIN to:
Bronwen Powell: bxp15@psu.edu


Description

Landscapes around the world are changing rapidly, and land use policy makers are faced with competing demands and limited evidence on which to base decisions. Many conservationists argue that agricultural intensification will be the best way to conserve biodiversity while providing sufficient food (Balmford et al. 2018, Phalan et al. 2011). Yet, in many places “agricultural intensification” has meant increasingly large scale agriculture and a focus on increasing yields of staple crops (Moseley et al. 2015) at the cost of diverse production needed to ensure diet quality. To date very little attention has been paid to the ways land use change and landscape composition and configuration impact diet quality, nutrition and the production of diverse healthy foods.

The world now faces a “triple burden” of malnutrition: while the world has made some progress to reducing hunger, global rates of micronutrient deficiency remain stubbornly high and rates of obesity rates and impaired glucose tolerance are climbing (IFPRI 2016). With diet quality a top risk factor for mortality globally, and the common denominator for all forms of malnutrition, understanding how land use change impacts the production and consumption of healthy foods that contribute to diet quality and nutrition is essential.Policies that focus on intensification and increasing yields of staple crops, without attention to nutritionally important foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes and lean animal foods, will do little to improve the global nutrition situation.

This session will highlight the ways that landscape change impacts the availability and consumption of healthy foods. Emerging evidence suggests that a large portion of nutritionally important foods are produced on small farms, in diverse agricultural landscapes (Hererro et al. 2017) and that landscapes which include trees and forests are better able to provide a healthy and diverse diet for local people (Ickowitz et al. 2014, Rasolofoson et al. 2018). The production of cheap staple foods has led to rapid change in agricultural landscapes: continuing this trajectory will not likely have a positive impact on either human nutrition or agricultural sustainability.

References:
Balmford, A., Amano, T., Bartlett, H., Chadwick, D., Collins, A., Edwards, D., ... & Waters, H. (2018). The environmental costs and benefits of high-yield farming. Nature Sustainability, 1(9), 477.

Herrero, M., Thornton, P.K., Power, B., Bogard, J.R., Remans, R., Fritz, S., Gerber, J.S., Nelson, G., See, L., Waha, K., 2017. Farming and the geography of nutrient production for human use: a transdisciplinary analysis. The Lancet Planetary Health 1(1), e33-e42.

Ickowitz, A., Powell, B., Salim, M.A., Sunderland, T., 2014. Dietary Quality and Tree Cover in Africa. Global Environmental Change 24, 287-294.

Moseley, W., Schnurr, M., Bezner Kerr, R., 2015. Interrogating the technocratic (neoliberal) agenda for agricultural development and hunger alleviation in Africa. African Geographical Review 34(1), 1-7.

Phalan, B., Onial, M., Balmford, A., Green, R.E., 2011. Reconciling Food Production and Biodiversity Conservation: Land Sharing and Land Sparing Compared. Science 333(6047), 1289-1291.

Rasolofoson, R., Hanauer, M., Pappinen, A., Fisher, B., Ricketts, T., 2018. Effects of forests on children's diets in developing countries: a cross-sectional study. The Lancet Planetary Health 2, S15.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Matthew Cooper*, University of Maryland, Testing the "Safety Net" Hypothesis 20 5:00 PM
Presenter Bronwen Powell*, Pennsylvania State University, Dietary quality, nutrition and landscape structure 20 5:20 PM
Presenter Mario Reinaldo Machado*, Clark University, What's going on with land-use in Cuba? Disparate data sets and the Cuban agricultural transition 20 5:40 PM
Presenter Sidney Madsen*, Cornell University, Multiple agroecological pathways to smallholder food security in Malawi: Differential household outcomes and the role of provisioning strategies and social support 20 6:00 PM
Presenter Zeynab Jouzi*, North Carolina State University., Stacy Nelson, North Carolina State University., Yu-Fai Leung, North Carolina State University., A proposed remote-sensing approach to analyzing the association between environmental changes and human health in Sub-Saharan Africa 20 6:20 PM

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