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Geovizualization of residential tranquility and safety in Paris

Authors: Valentin Maigret*, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise
Topics: Quantitative Methods
Keywords: social housing, safety, residential tranquility, cartography, data, multivariate analysis, urban violence, geovizualisation
Session Type: Paper
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Many of the current debates in France regarding insecurity focus on social housing. Largely stigmatized, neighborhoods having a larger percentage of social housing than the average arouse apprehension and even fear with a collective imagination fueled by political and mediatic discourses. Having gathered data from Paris Habitat (the largest social landlord of Paris, with more than 125,000 housing units at its expense) the aim of this research is to deconstruct these discourses, to avoid abusive generalizations and to insist on the heterogeneity of territories.
This research proposes a quantitative analysis of data related to safety issues (incivilities, degradation) in social housing. This analysis helps to provide additional explanatory dimensions to the nature of the safety phenomena identified within these dwellings, and to map these. With this approach, it is possible to integrate social housing and tenants of Paris Habitat in the socio-economic context of Paris.
By cross-referencing the safety data and housing data and its tenants coming from these indicators, I propose a multivariate analysis (by first constituting a population of the "residential tranquility and safety" situation whose statistical individuals will be Paris Habitat sites, described by different quantitative variables) in an attempt to establish statistical correlations between safety data and housing attributes and its inhabitants. Using GIS, these data are mapped in a second time, proposing an unusual geography of insecurity in Paris.

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