Low carbon reuses of agricultural brownfields: A lesson from the energy transition in Central Europe

Authors: Stanislav Martinat*, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Josef Navratil, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Petr Klusacek, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Robert Osman, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Tomas Krejci, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Kamil Picha, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Jaroslav Skrabal, Institute of Geonics of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Topics: Energy, Agricultural Geography, Europe
Keywords: Brownfields, Agricultural transition, Energy transition, Central Europe, Post-socialism, Reuse, Abandonment
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/9/2020
Start / End Time: 3:20 PM / 4:35 PM
Room: Plaza Court 8, Sheraton, Concourse Level
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


The aim of the study is to more deeply comprehend varieties of agricultural and energy transitions in Central Europe on the example of the change of utilization of former agricultural premises that lost their original function due to massive decay of agriculture in the region in the last three decades. A database has been developed containing agricultural premises located in various natural locations in 1989 and varieties of their uses in 2004 and 2017. As a main driving force of the transformation of utilization of pre-1989 agricultural premises is a huge social and economic change that has occurred in Central Europe since 1990s but significant importance has been also to given to particularities and local contexts of communities where these brownfields are located. From 1989 to 2004, a number of agricultural brownfields occurred as a result of decay of farming, and many sites had been utilized for non-agricultural purposes. After 2004, acreage of agricultural brownfields has been reduced and new utilizations for housing and especially other non-agricultural activities significantly increased. We found that especially after 2004 energy transition significantly affects decisions of owners how to reuse their agricultural brownfields. Among new reuses suddenly in this period appear photovoltaic power plants (both on-ground and on-roof mounted) and anaerobic digestion (AD) plants. AD plants, even more, deepened the level of agricultural change in the region as they started to be fed by purposely grown crops that displaced food production. We are grateful for the financial support of CSF, project No.19-23870S.

Abstract Information

This abstract is already part of a session. View the session here.

To access contact information login