Feminists Theorizing Fisheries: Roots and Futures

Authors: Christine Knott*, , Barbara Neis, Memorial University, Nicole Power, Memorial University
Topics: Human-Environment Geography
Keywords: Feminists Fisheries
Session Type: Paper
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Research on gender and fisheries globally over the past 40 years has demonstrated the persistence of the industries reliance on unpaid work of women and women’s inequitable access to fisheries wealth and infrastructure. Less research has drawn on feminist theories to rethink human inequalities from an intersectional perspective and even less research has looked at gender and other social inequalities as related to non-human inequalities. Similarly, research outside of fisheries that focus on social ecological systems, ecosystem management, or engages with critical Anthropocene literatures to include both a human and more than human focus, rarely engages with ecofeminist theoretical works. In this paper we highlight past and current feminist informed theoretical framings in fisheries research in the Global North to offer a more comprehensive feminist framework that draws on insights from eco-feminism, emerging scholarship on more-than-human relations, and feminist ethics of care. This feminist framework provides a more comprehensive understanding of a broad range of social relations of oppression as inherently connected which encapsulates gender and our damaging relationship to nature, including fish. We explore feminist frameworks that move beyond approaches that prioritize counting women and instead pay attention to ways to produce more ethical local communities and economies.

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