Threats of climate change to food security in Small Oceanic Islands: a modeling case in the Galapagos Islands

Authors: Carolina Sampedro*, Instituto de Geografia, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Carlos Mena, Instituto de Geografia, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Homero Paltán, Instituto de Geografia, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Lorena Benítez, Instituto de Geografia, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Marilú Valverde, INIAP, Galápagos, Ecuador
Topics: Coupled Human and Natural Systems, Global Change, Pacific Islands
Keywords: Galapagos, Islands, Food Security, Climate Change
Session Type: Paper
Day: 4/9/2020
Start / End Time: 3:20 PM / 4:35 PM
Room: Capitol Ballroom 5, Hyatt Regency, Fourth Floor
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Small oceanic islands (SOI) are heavily impacted by climate change, threatening vulnerable peoples and ecosystems. We will explore the linkages between climate change and food security that affect exposed local population and agricultural areas. Oceanic islands have intrinsically low levels of accessibility, difficult transportation of goods and services and, often, poor agricultural practices. Moreover, SOI respond to many exogenous shocks, such as the pressure of tourism and high degree of economic dependence from mainland areas. We aim to discuss a theoretical model of the relationship of climate change and agriculture, specifically to SOIs, looking for understanding of climate effects on food security in the Galapagos. We also apply a dynamic mechanistic model linking climate change and food production in the Galapagos Islands of Ecuador. Climate change creates negative feedbacks in food security by strengthening the invasion of exotic species, generating uncertain climatic scenarios for farming, and creating synergisms with to other external shocks that affect population by threatening sustainable local agriculture.

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