In order to join virtual sessions, you must be registered and logged-in(Were you registered for the in-person meeting in Denver? if yes, just log in.) 
Note: All session times are in Mountain Daylight Time.

Strategies for Developing Climate Services for Public Health: Case Studies from Puerto Rico and Dominica

Authors: Jen Henderson*, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Zack Guido, University of Arizona, Pablo A Mendez-Lazaro, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, Graduate School of Public Health, Jazmin Diaz Rivera, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Ernesto Rodriguez, National Weather Service, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Theodore Allen, Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology, Jennifer Spinney, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Benét Duncan, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado, Boulder, Simon J Mason, International Research Institute for Climate and Society Palisades, Columbia University, Firoz Abdoel Wahid, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine , Hannah Covert, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Maureen Y Lichtveld, Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
Topics: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters, Climatology and Meteorology, Qualitative Research
Keywords: transdisciplinary research, heat, public health, Dominica, Puerto Rico
Session Type: Guided Poster
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Changes in the variability and mean states of the climate system have spurred scientific efforts to connect climate impacts information to informed decision-making. In recent years, climate services has emerged as a holistic approach to develop, tailor, translate, and facilitate the use of this information. The evolution of climate services has moved from a “loading dock” approach to a more collaborative form of knowledge production, often drawing on principles of participatory research and the co-production of knowledge. Many climate service activities now involve collaboration between information providers and users that include university researchers, operational weather and climate scientists, and resource managers and/or policy makers. While
much of the research about the collaborative elements of climate services has focused on the interactions between the providers and users, less attention has been paid to the collaborative process among the providers. In this work, we draw from insights on transdisciplinarity and team science, specifically climate and public health, to analyze climate service case studies conducted in two sites in the Caribbean, both funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency’s International Research and Applications Project. The project’s objective is to develop climate and weather information for public health stakeholders in Puerto Rico and Dominica. We report on the process and challenges experienced in these case studies, as well as strategies for designing climate service projects. Our results are particularly germane to research projects that seek to explore new areas of climate service application.

Abstract Information

This abstract is already part of a session. View the session here.

To access contact information login