Buyouts, Organized Retreat, and Climate-related Relocation

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group, Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group
Organizers: Elyse Zavar
Chairs: Elyse Zavar

Call for Submissions

As the impacts of climate change render some landscapes inhospitable to human occupation, this session explores key issues associated with organized or planned retreat, including buyout programs. Increasingly more communities are implementing organized retreat strategies to address the risks associated with repetitive hazards (e.g. flooding, land subsidence, toxic exposure) and the effects of climate change, including sea level rise. By relocating people and structures out of high-risk areas and converting the land to open space, these mitigation projects can potentially reduce risk in hazard-prone areas; however, research indicates relocation programs can negatively impact communities (Binder and Greer 2016). Geographers play a vital role in understanding the complexities of organized retreat. Key topics and considerations include: Community design and implementation of relocation programs; Community engagement and participation in relocation programs; Policies and funding mechanisms associated with relocation programs; Where people relocate to and the ability of the new location to meet their needs (e.g. work, transportation, social networks); Place attachment, nostalgia for former homes, and commemoration; and Land uses on post-buyout open space, including opportunities for green infrastructure. This session seeks paper presentations on all topics related to organized retreat, buyouts, property acquisition, and relocation programs to foster discussions and advance our collective understanding of these complex programs.

If you are interested in participating in this session, please send your abstract to Elyse Zavar (elyse.zavar@unt.edu) by October 9, 2019.

References
Binder, S.B. & Greer, A. 2016. The devil is in the details: Linking home buyout policy, practice, and experience after Hurricane Sandy. Politics and Governance, 4(4), p.97-106.


Description

As the impacts of climate change render some landscapes inhospitable to human occupation, this session explores key issues associated with organized or planned retreat, including buyout programs. Increasingly more communities are implementing organized retreat strategies to address the risks associated with repetitive hazards (e.g. flooding, land subsidence, toxic exposure) and the effects of climate change, including sea level rise. By relocating people and structures out of high-risk areas and converting the land to open space, these mitigation projects can potentially reduce risk in hazard-prone areas; however, research indicates relocation programs can negatively impact communities (Binder and Greer 2016). Geographers play a vital role in understanding the complexities of organized retreat. Therefore, this session examines topics related to organized retreat, buyouts, property acquisition, and relocation programs to foster discussions and advance our collective understanding of these complex programs.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes
Presenter Hannah-Hunt Moeller*, MIT, Brent Ryan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Rising Tides: Relocation Principles for Sea Level Rise Adaptation 15
Presenter Katherine Nelson*, Kansas State University, Michael Molloy, Kansas State University, The Sociodemographic Landscape of Three Decades of FEMA Buyouts 15
Presenter Elyse Zavar*, University of North Texas, Alex Greer, University at Albany, Sherri Brokopp Binder, BrokoppBinder Research & Consulting, Managing Open Space: Stakeholder Perspectives on Post-Buyout Land Uses in Harris County, Texas 15
Presenter Ross Guida*, SHSU, Adam Camp, SHSU, Matthew Hilburn, SHSU, Hanna Hoffman, SHSU, Brooke Jennings, SHSU, The Evolving “100-year” Floodplain of the San Jacinto River, Montgomery County, Texas 15
Presenter Ryan Miller*, University of California, Davis, Risk, Real Estate, and Climate Gentrification: A Difference-in-Differences Analysis of Flood Effects in Three US Counties 15

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