Urban Climate Governance

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Organizers: Kris Bezdecny
Chairs: Kris Bezdecny

Call for Submissions

The IPCC’s latest report, and nearly-daily headlines over the past few years, confirm that the Paris Climate Agreement is not enough to prevent temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius or more in the coming decades. With these temperature rises we will see increased sunshine flooding, wildfires, heatwaves, extreme winter weather, intensification of hurricanes, sea level rise, water scarcity, and more. Yet many of the countries who were signatories to the Paris Accord, most notably the United States, are not meeting those already-deemed insufficient milestones.

In the vacuum of nation-state abrogation of responsibility, and with the majority of the world’s population now living in cities, many municipal and urban-regional governments and governance entities have taken leadership roles in addressing climate issues, both locally for their communities, and on national and global stages. Mayors of cities such as Los Angeles and London are as much household names as heads of state. But within this dynamic several questions arise:

• What are the roles of cities as sites of adaptation/mitigation/solutions – and as sites of responsibility?
• Who has rights to the city space within the context of urban climate governance – and who will bear the consequences, socially and ecologically, for the decisions made?
• How does the post-political technocratic nature of contemporary urban governance structures impact who can, and will, participate in decision-making processes?
• Which leaders within a city-region will speak hegemonically for that region – or will decisions take a more collaborative approach?

We welcome any presenters addressing these and any/all related questions, including both more empirical and more theoretical treatments of the role of cities in addressing climate issues moving forward. Please contact Kris Bezdecny (kbezdec@calstatela.edu) with your title and abstract by October 20, 2019.


Description

The IPCC’s latest report, and nearly-daily headlines over the past few years, confirm that the Paris Climate Agreement is not enough to prevent temperature rises of 1.5 degrees Celsius or more in the coming decades. With these temperature rises we will see increased sunshine flooding, wildfires, heatwaves, extreme winter weather, intensification of hurricanes, sea level rise, water scarcity, and more. Yet many of the countries who were signatories to the Paris Accord, most notably the United States, are not meeting those already-deemed insufficient milestones.

In the vacuum of nation-state abrogation of responsibility, and with the majority of the world’s population now living in cities, many municipal and urban-regional governments and governance entities have taken leadership roles in addressing climate issues, both locally for their communities, and on national and global stages. Mayors of cities such as Los Angeles and London are as much household names as heads of state. But within this dynamic several questions arise:

• What are the roles of cities as sites of adaptation/mitigation/solutions – and as sites of responsibility?
• Who has rights to the city space within the context of urban climate governance – and who will bear the consequences, socially and ecologically, for the decisions made?
• How does the post-political technocratic nature of contemporary urban governance structures impact who can, and will, participate in decision-making processes?
• Which leaders within a city-region will speak hegemonically for that region – or will decisions take a more collaborative approach?

We welcome any presenters addressing these and any/all related questions, including both more empirical and more theoretical treatments of the role of cities in addressing climate issues moving forward.


Agenda

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