Trees in the City 2: Socio-Ecological Dynamics in the Urban Forest

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group, Urban Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/7/2020
Start / End Time: 10:15 AM / 11:30 AM
Room: Director's Row H, Sheraton, Plaza Building, Lobby Level
Organizers: Shawn Landry, Tenley Conway
Chairs: Tenley Conway

Call for Submissions

Call for Papers
Trees in the City 2020: Socio-Ecological Dynamics in the Urban Forest

Rough draft of abstract is due Oct. 21, 2019 via email to organizers.

2020 AAG Annual Meeting in Denver, CO (April 6-10, 2020)
http://annualmeeting.aag.org/

Sponsorships:
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizers:
Tenley M. Conway, University of Toronto, Mississauga, tenley.conway@utoronto.ca
Shawn Landry, University of South Florida, landry@usf.edu

Urban forests are integral components of the urban social and ecological systems of the city. Moreover, trees are often framed as the solution or a mitigation strategy to address a laundry-list of problems facing cities. Justifications for urban forestry investments have included concepts such as the potential of increasing ecosystem services, using trees as green infrastructure to reduce the demand for gray infrastructure, mitigating and adapting to climate change, and/or addressing existing uneven access to a natural amenity. The presence and condition of urban trees is determined by a complex set of factors, many of which result from socio-ecological conditions and policy driven decisions at multiple spatial scales. Given the recent re-investment in urban forests occurring in many North American cities, monitoring and management of trees and green spaces has become an important object for government policy, business strategy and academic research.

For this session at the AAG, we are particularly looking for presentations that:
• Utilize geospatial methods to measure or monitor the urban forest
• Examine socio-ecological interactions in the urban forest
• Explore urban forestry policy and program impacts

We are also organizing a field trip and a panel session to follow the paper sessions. This year’s panel will discuss and debate urban forests in arid/semi-arid cities. Please send us any panelist suggestions that you may have (including yourself).

If you would like to participate in the paper sessions at the 2018 AAG, please follow these instructions: (1) Submit your (draft) abstract to us by October 21, 2019; (2) We will notify you if your paper will be selected for the Trees in the City sessions by October 24, 2019; (3) You must then register and submit your official abstract to AAG prior to the October 30, 2019 deadline (http://annualmeeting.aag.org/) and send us your abstract submission confirmation email. Please send all email correspondence to both tenley.conway@utoronto.ca and landry@usf.edu.


Description

Organizers:
Tenley M. Conway, University of Toronto, Mississauga, tenley.conway@utoronto.ca
Shawn Landry, University of South Florida, landry@usf.edu

Urban forests are integral components of the urban social and ecological systems of the city. Moreover, trees are often framed as the solution or a mitigation strategy to address a laundry-list of problems facing cities. Justifications for urban forestry investments have included concepts such as the potential of increasing ecosystem services, using trees as green infrastructure to reduce the demand for gray infrastructure, mitigating and adapting to climate change, and/or addressing existing uneven access to a natural amenity. The presence and condition of urban trees is determined by a complex set of factors, many of which result from socio-ecological conditions and policy driven decisions at multiple spatial scales. Given the recent re-investment in urban forests occurring in many North American cities, monitoring and management of trees and green spaces has become an important object for government policy, business strategy and academic research.

For this session at the AAG, we are particularly looking for presentations that:
• Utilize geospatial methods to measure or monitor the urban forest
• Examine socio-ecological interactions in the urban forest
• Explore urban forestry policy and program impacts


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Shawn Landry*, University of South Florida, Geoffrey H Donovan, USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station, Portland, OR, USA., Urban Tree Cover, Vegetation Diversity, and Asthma: Evidence from 500 Cities 15 10:15 AM
Presenter Darrel Jenerette*, University of California Riverside, Peter Ibsen, University of California Riverside, Dion Kucera, University of California Riverside, Sharon Harlan, Northeastern University, Matai Georgescue, Arizona State University, A continental forecast of future urban vegetation, temperature, and equity 15 10:30 AM
Presenter Lorien Nesbitt*, University of British Columbia, Cecil Konijnendijk, University of British Columbia, Nathanael Lauster, University of British Columbia, Hyeone Park, University of British Columbia, Intercultural exchange in contested space: the biocultural diversity of urban forests through the lens of Vancouver, Canada 15 10:45 AM
Presenter Tenley Conway, University of Toronto- Mississauga, Janina Kowalski*, University of Toronto - Mississauga, Where the Fruit Falls: The Governance of Urban Food Trees 15 11:00 AM
Presenter Lara Roman*, USDA Forest Service, Moving beyond ‘trees are good’: Disservices and costs of urban forests 15 11:15 AM

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