Applications of unmanned aerial vehicles to landscape research at small extents

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Landscape Specialty Group
Organizers: Katherine Markham, Kunwar Singh
Chairs: Katherine Markham

Call for Submissions

The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and remotely piloted aircraft have drastically changed how geographers study landscapes. UAS allows us to take rapid and repeated measurements and fill the gap between in-situ methods and satellite remote sensing, changing the scale at which we can study landscapes. Their use is transforming our understanding of the environment, ecology, agriculture, and other related fields. UAS are increasingly used to study small extent areas and can often effectively replace terrestrial methods of data collection. For example, UAS data are used to capture small extent gaps in the canopy that most satellite imagery would not detect and that would be more time-consuming to measure in-situ. This paper session explores the use of UAS in studying small extent landscapes and how their rapid advancement is transforming our knowledge of the landscape.

We seek papers that present innovative ways UAS are being used for research and in practice, and we welcome submissions from all branches of geography. We encourage papers that explore current limitations of UAS, present case studies, discuss operational aspects of UAS, and/or offer new insights concerning applications.

If you are interested in joining this session, please email Kate Markham (katherine.markham@gmail.com) your abstract, paper title, and PIN before October 30th, 2019.


Description

The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and remotely piloted aircraft have drastically changed how geographers study landscapes. UAS allows us to take rapid and repeated measurements and fill the gap between in-situ methods and satellite remote sensing, changing the scale at which we can study landscapes. Their use is transforming our understanding of the environment, ecology, agriculture, and other related fields. UAS are increasingly used to study small extent areas and can often effectively replace terrestrial methods of data collection. For example, UAS data are used to capture small extent gaps in the canopy that most satellite imagery would not detect and that would be more time-consuming to measure in-situ. This paper session explores the use of UAS in studying small extent landscapes and how their rapid advancement is transforming our knowledge of the landscape.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes

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