Geography, Substance Use, and Addiction 1

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/6/2020
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:20 PM
Room: Director's Row J, Sheraton, Plaza Building, Lobby Level
Organizers: Jeremy Mennis, Kathleen Stewart, Andrea Rishworth
Chairs: Jeremy Mennis

Call for Submissions

Geography, Substance Use, and Addiction

Session organizers: Jeremy Mennis, Temple University, and Kathleen Stewart, University of Maryland

The use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs represents one of the greatest threats to public health in the US and worldwide. This session brings together researchers who are interested in geographic topics relating to substance use and addiction, such as:

• Spatial or spatiotemporal patterns of substance use and substance use disorders
• Geographic aspects of substance use prevention and interventions
• Geographic aspects of substance use disorder treatment, relapse, or recovery
• Place effects on substance use behaviors
• The intersection of spatial and social factors in substance use
• Geographic contexts of substance use and mental health
• New data sources for analyzing substance use, including crowdsourcing, social media, and big data
• Quantitative spatial, longitudinal, and geostatistical techniques for investigating substance use
• Qualitative geographic techniques for investigating substance use

Other related topics are also welcome. To apply, register and submit your abstract online following the AAG guidelines. Then send your abstracts and PIN number to Jeremy Mennis (jmennis@temple.edu) and Kathleen Stewart (stewartk@umd.edu) by October 30, 2019.



Description

Addiction is a chronic disease of the brain that can alter cognitive functioning, mood, and behavior, with negative effects on multiple health outcomes. Substance use disorders involving tobacco, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs represent one of the largest threats to public health worldwide. The United States is no exception, where legalization in many states has rapidly changed the accessibility to, and social norms around, cannabis, and the nation faces a rapidly accelerating crisis concerning addiction to opioids, including heroin, fentanyl, and prescription painkillers. This session brings together researchers who are interested in geographic topics relating to substance use and addiction.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Harvey Miller*, The Ohio State University, Ayaz Hyder, The Ohio State University, Lauren Southerland , The Ohio State University, Gretchen Clark Hammond , Mighty Crow Media, Adam Porr, The Ohio State University, Ashley Dundon, The Ohio State University, Jinhyung Lee, The Ohio State University, Yuchen Li, The Ohio State University, The Franklin County Opioid Crisis Activity Level (FOCAL) Map: New insights into the spatial dynamics of opioid overdose events and their social determinants 15 3:05 PM
Presenter Zhiyue Xia*, Department of Geographical Science, University of Maryland, Kathleen Stewart, Department of Geographical Science, University of Maryland, Junchuan Fan, Department of Geographical Science, University of Maryland, Learning spatiotemporal patterns of drug activity in Chicago, IL using a Random Forest model 15 3:20 PM
Presenter Alan Delmerico*, Institute for Community Health Promotion, William Wieczorek, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Exposure to Risky Environments and Adolescent Substance Use Initiation and Continuation 15 3:35 PM
Presenter Thomas P. McKeon*, Temple University, Jeremy Mennis, Temple University, Gerald J. Stahler, Temple University, Investigating Admissions for U.S. State Marijuana Substance Use Disorder Treatment in the Era of Increased Use and Lowered Perceived Risk 15 3:50 PM
Presenter Jeremy Mennis*, Temple University, Gerald J Stahler, Temple University, Does Recreational Marijuana Legalization Increase Substance Use Disorders for Cocaine, Opioids, or Methamphetamines? Evidence from Colorado and Washington 15 4:05 PM

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