Intersections of Race and Tourism Geographies I

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Recreation, Tourism, and Sport Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/6/2020
Start / End Time: 1:30 PM / 2:45 PM
Room: Plaza Court 7, Sheraton, Concourse Level
Organizers: Ethan Bottone
Chairs: Ethan Bottone

Call for Submissions

AAG 2020 CFP: Intersections of Race and Tourism Geographies

The effects of tourism reach further than into the pockets of those who travel and those who run the travel-related businesses. People connected to the tourism complex are also affected by psychological, emotional, social, and cultural processes that play out in both tourist sources and destinations. The global tourism industry also affects those who live in destinations (but don’t actively participate in the industry itself), those who labor to produce goods utilized in the industry, and even the natural environment that is the setting for all travel and tourism. As a result of the industry’s pervasiveness, scholars of travel and tourism have argued for the inclusion of humanities and other disciplines that have embraced critically-oriented theories. Investigations of the intersections of race and tourism have been particularly advocated for, given the historical legacies of racialized enslavement, segregation, and discrimination and the contemporary rise of nationalist politics that villainize racial “others.”

Increasingly, scholars are exploring the multifaceted relationships between race and tourism. For example, Carolyn Finney (2014) has written about the relationship between African Americans and nature, including ecotourism, while scholars such as Philipp (1994) and Lee & Scott (2016) investigated racial motivations for visiting (or not visiting) certain tourism destinations. Research has also revealed the racialization of narratives interpreted at tourism destinations; perhaps the most discussed example of this phenomenon is found at former plantation sites that are open to the public (e.g. Carter et al. 2014). Scholars have also shown that tourism can be used to combat racism and perform a healing role for communities of color (Drew 2011; Skipper 2016). As these example pieces evidence, the intersection of race and tourism is expansive, yet geographers and others continue to call for the inclusion of race in tourism research (Alderman 2018).

This paper session seeks to address Alderman’s (2018) call by bringing together scholars who are actively researching the intersections of racial geographies and tourism geographies. This session calls for a broad array of papers from all aspects of tourism geographies (tourism development, tourism promotion, visitor motivations, interpretation at tourism destinations, etc.) that engage with geographies of race. Papers from a variety of geographic locations are encouraged to submit, and both empirical and theoretical works are welcome as well.

Potential themes that papers could be presented on include (but are not limited to):

Inclusion/exclusion of people of color in tourism promotional literature
Dispossession through tourism development
Violent politics of tourism
Resistant/resilient forms of tourism
Resistance to tourism development
Interpretation of racialized landscapes at tourism destinations
Travel patterns and behavior
Emotional and affective aspects of travel
Racialized souvenirs

If you would like to participate in this session(s), please email your abstract to Ethan Bottone (ebottone@vols.utk.edu) by October 25th, as well as any questions or comments that you may have.

Thank you for your consideration, and hope to see you all at AAG!

Ethan Bottone
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Geography
University of Tennessee, Knoxville

References:

Alderman, D.H. (2018). The racialized and violent biopolitics of mobility in the USA: An agenda for tourism geographies. Tourism Geographies 20 (4): 717-720.

Carter, P., Butler, D.L., & Alderman, D.H. (2014). The house that story built: The place of slavery in plantation museum narratives. The Professional Geographer 66 (4): 547-557.

Drew, E.M. (2011). Strategies for antiracist representation: Ethnic tourism guides in Chicago. Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change 9 (2): 55-69.

Finney, C. (2014). Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press.

Lee, K.J. & Scott, D. (2016). Bourdieu and African Americans’ park visitation: The case of Cedar Hills State Park in Texas. Leisure Sciences 38 (5): 424-440.

Philipp, S.F. (1994). Race and tourism choice: A legacy of discrimination? Annals of Tourism Research 21 (3): 479-488.

Skipper, J. (2016). Community development through reconciliation tourism: The behind the Big House Program in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Community Development 47 (4): 514-529.


Description

The effects of tourism reach further than into the pockets of those who travel and those who run the travel-related businesses. People connected to the tourism complex are also affected by psychological, emotional, social, and cultural processes that play out in both tourist sources and destinations. The global tourism industry also affects those who live in destinations (but don’t actively participate in the industry itself), those who labor to produce goods utilized in the industry, and even the natural environment that is the setting for all travel and tourism. As a result of the industry’s pervasiveness, scholars of travel and tourism have argued for the inclusion of humanities and other disciplines that have embraced critically-oriented theories. Investigations of the intersections of race and tourism have been particularly advocated for, given the historical legacies of racialized enslavement, segregation, and discrimination and the contemporary rise of nationalist politics that villainize racial “others.”

Increasingly, scholars are exploring the multifaceted relationships between race and tourism. For example, Carolyn Finney (2014) has written about the relationship between African Americans and nature, including ecotourism, while scholars such as Philipp (1994) and Lee & Scott (2016) investigated racial motivations for visiting (or not visiting) certain tourism destinations. Research has also revealed the racialization of narratives interpreted at tourism destinations; perhaps the most discussed example of this phenomenon is found at former plantation sites that are open to the public (e.g. Carter et al. 2014). Scholars have also shown that tourism can be used to combat racism and perform a healing role for communities of color (Drew 2011; Skipper 2016). As these example pieces evidence, the intersection of race and tourism is expansive, yet geographers and others continue to call for the inclusion of race in tourism research (Alderman 2018).

This paper session seeks to address Alderman’s (2018) call by bringing together scholars who are actively researching the intersections of racial geographies and tourism geographies. This session calls for a broad array of papers from all aspects of tourism geographies (tourism development, tourism promotion, visitor motivations, interpretation at tourism destinations, etc.) that engage with geographies of race. Papers from a variety of geographic locations are encouraged to submit, and both empirical and theoretical works are welcome as well.

References:

Alderman, D.H. (2018). The racialized and violent biopolitics of mobility in the USA: An agenda for tourism geographies. Tourism Geographies 20 (4): 717-720.

Carter, P., Butler, D.L., & Alderman, D.H. (2014). The house that story built: The place of slavery in plantation museum narratives. The Professional Geographer 66 (4): 547-557.

Drew, E.M. (2011). Strategies for antiracist representation: Ethnic tourism guides in Chicago. Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change 9 (2): 55-69.

Finney, C. (2014). Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press.

Lee, K.J. & Scott, D. (2016). Bourdieu and African Americans’ park visitation: The case of Cedar Hills State Park in Texas. Leisure Sciences 38 (5): 424-440.

Philipp, S.F. (1994). Race and tourism choice: A legacy of discrimination? Annals of Tourism Research 21 (3): 479-488.

Skipper, J. (2016). Community development through reconciliation tourism: The behind the Big House Program in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Community Development 47 (4): 514-529.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Perry Carter*, Texas Tech University, Bearing Witness in Images, Paper, and Pixels: Memory Objects and their Creators 15 1:30 PM
Presenter Amy Potter*, Georgia Southern University, “A Pledge of Allegiance to the South:” Commemorating the Enslaved at Historic House Museums in Kansas City, Missouri 15 1:45 PM
Presenter Emma Walcott-Wilson*, University of Tennessee, Toward a Sensory Ethnography of Plantation Museums: Emotional Labor, Affect, and Place-Making At McLeod Plantation Historic Site 15 2:00 PM
Presenter Stephen Hanna*, University of Mary Washington, Kelsey Chavers, University of Mary Washington, Chinnae Faustor, University of Mary Washington, Kylie James, University of Mary Washington, Emma J Walcott-Wilson, University of Tennessee, Descendant Community Impacts on Visitor Experiences at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello 15 2:15 PM
Discussant Ethan Bottone University of Tennessee 15 2:30 PM

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