Risk Communication and Resilience

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/10/2020
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:15 AM
Room: Plaza Court 5, Sheraton, Concourse Level
Organizers: Bandana Kar, Jordan Burns, DeeDee Bennett
Chairs: Jordan Burns

Call for Submissions

Organizers:
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
DeeDee Bennett, University at Albany, dmbennett@albany.edu
Jordan Nicole Burns, NIYAMIT Inc., jburns@niyamit.com

This will be the sixth consecutive year that we have organized the Risk Communication and Resilience sessions at AAG meetings. Thanks to all our presenters and to all who have attended these sessions over the years.

Description
Risk communication, defined as the exchange of information among stakeholders about a disaster with the intent to help people take risk reduction actions, is a central part of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Resilience is a process that increases capacity through the proactive and positive engagement of stakeholders so that disaster-impacted communities can quickly return to a pre-disaster state or even attain better-than-pre-disaster states, thereby enhancing sustainability. While risk communication is one aspect of building resilience, community resilience also can be improved by (i) increasing public awareness of risk and their role in risk reduction, (ii) assessing risk, (iii) increasing stakeholder participation in policy preparation and implementation, and (iv) sharing knowledge/information/lessons learned among communities. The collective experience of hurricanes Florence, Harvey, Irma, and Maria indicate that social media plays an increasingly important role in disseminating information for preparation, response, and rescue. In light of these and other disasters, it is timely to discuss what actions should be taken to integrate citizen science, crowdsourcing, and risk communication in building resilient communities. Research topics include, but are not limited to:
• The effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of Wireless Emergency Alerts, mobile devices, and mobile applications in increasing risk communication coverage.
• The role of social media in increasing citizen participation and the issues and concerns expressed by emergency managers and the public regarding use of social media in risk communication and resilience building efforts.
• Proactive approaches to resilience (risk assessment, risk management, risk communication) that have been effective in reducing hazard impacts.
• How can social media be used to bolster emergency preparedness? How does social media influence resilience and recovery?
• What is the future of resilience-based research? Is there a difference between individual resilience and community resilience? Finally, is it possible for global society to reach a level of resilience where the impacts of hazards are negligible?

If you would like to participate, please submit your abstract through the AAG website (www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/register), and send us your abstract PIN and your abstract (250 words max) by October 30th, 2019.

Where/When: Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 6-10, 2020, Denver, CO. Additional information regarding the conference could be found at: https://www2.aag.org/aagannualmeeting/.


Description

Risk communication, defined as the exchange of information among stakeholders about a disaster with the intent to help people take risk reduction actions, is a central part of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Resilience is a process that increases capacity through the proactive and positive engagement of stakeholders so that disaster-impacted communities can quickly return to a pre-disaster state or even attain better-than-pre-disaster states, thereby enhancing sustainability. While risk communication is one aspect of building resilience, community resilience also can be improved by (i) increasing public awareness of risk and their role in risk reduction, (ii) assessing risk, (iii) increasing stakeholder participation in policy preparation and implementation, and (iv) sharing knowledge/information/lessons learned among communities. The collective experience of hurricanes Florence, Harvey, Irma, and Maria indicate that social media plays an increasingly important role in disseminating information for preparation, response, and rescue. In light of these and other disasters, it is timely to discuss what actions should be taken to integrate citizen science, crowdsourcing, and risk communication in building resilient communities. Research topics include, but are not limited to:
• The effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of Wireless Emergency Alerts, mobile devices, and mobile applications in increasing risk communication coverage.
• The role of social media in increasing citizen participation and the issues and concerns expressed by emergency managers and the public regarding use of social media in risk communication and resilience building efforts.
• Proactive approaches to resilience (risk assessment, risk management, risk communication) that have been effective in reducing hazard impacts.
• How can social media be used to bolster emergency preparedness? How does social media influence resilience and recovery?
• What is the future of resilience-based research? Is there a difference between individual resilience and community resilience? Finally, is it possible for global society to reach a level of resilience where the impacts of hazards are negligible?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Lily Bui*, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Warning Systems and Disaster Planning in the Island City 15 8:00 AM
Presenter Christopher Labosier*, Longwood University, Extreme Heat Perceptions and Responses in the Northeast US 15 8:15 AM
Presenter Ikramuddin Bahram*, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, Seismic Risk Perception Study of Earthquake Survivors: A Case Study from the Kashmir Earthquake 2005 15 8:30 AM
Presenter Keeley Heise*, Metropolitan Community College (Omaha, Nebraska), Preparing for a Blizzard: Actions and Perceptions in the Dakotas 15 8:45 AM
Presenter Rachel Correll*, Louisiana State University, Nina S. N. Lam, Louisiana State University, Lei Zou, Texas A&M University, Volodymyr Mihunov, Louisiana State University, Heng Cai, Louisiana State University, Flood Risk and Economic Opportunity: Moving Forward in a Changing Louisiana 15 9:00 AM

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