Sound, Space, Politics

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/7/2020
Start / End Time: 8:40 AM / 9:55 AM
Room: Beverly, Sheraton, IM Pei Tower, Terrace Level
Organizers: Luke Leavitt
Chairs: Luke Leavitt

Call for Submissions

This session seeks papers that explore the geographies of sound. Sound is ubiquitous in shaping daily life, embodied experience, public and private space, and imaginaries about people and places (Born 2013). Sound also helps configure non-human life processes and impacts certain inorganic flows. Sound is used for production and methods of extraction (e.g. emitting and reading seismic vibrations for locating oil reserves), facilitating metabolic flows of capital between "nature" and "society." Sound can also be used for torture and warfare (Goodman 2010). And it engenders subjectivities, often along hierarchies of class, gender, sexuality, nation, ability and more (Stoever 2016, Revill 2000). At the same time, it can denaturalize grids of power, often through creative practices, musical or not (McKittrick 2016, Moten 2017). The sonic clamor of the political assembly (Tausig 2018) or the public sound art installation (Wells and Baily 2018) can serve as creative political interventions in sound and space that are related but irreducible to music. With its own particular richness, sound helps create worlds in layered and often contrasting and contentious ways. Given sound’s importance and the variety of its influence on space, an increasing number of geographers have begun to pursue sound empirically, theoretically and methodologically. This paper invites submissions from all subfields that attended to sound as something that shapes space, and vice versa, given its own particular properties. This call likewise seeks papers that embrace sound as a mode of inquiry (e.g. listening), as a research method (Gallagher and Prior 2014), and/or as a way to communicate research findings. This session particularly encourages papers that explore the politics of sound. Possible topics include:

-The particular material, affective (Kanngieser 2012, Gallagher 2016), phenomenological (Revill 2016) and/or signifying properties of sound, their relation to making space and vice versa.

-Sound that confounds, complicates or confirms intersecting hierarchies of race, class, gender, sexuality, nation, ability and more (McKittrick 2016, Moten 2017, Stoever 2016, Revill 2000).

-Sound beyond human cochlear listening; non-human sound and listening (Kanngieser 2015); bio-acoustics, -sound, and -music .

-Uses of sound in spheres of production and extraction.

-Sound as violence, torture (Goodman 2010). Thanatosonics (Daughtry 2014).

-Political speech, polyvocality, metaphors and materialities of sound in the public sphere (Sassen 2013).

-Disability and deafness; tinnitus; hearing loss.

-The management of sound, technocratic approaches to sound, sound and planning, what is and is not noise “pollution,” the policing of sound.

-Impacts of sound within newer media environments (e.g. smart phones).

-Sound as a mode of inquiry, e.g. through deep listening or attunement (Brigstocke and Noorani 2016).

-Phonographic methods (Gallagher and Prior 2014), e.g. sound diaries (Duffy and Waitt 2011), sound walking (Butler 2006), sound mapping (Rich 2017) or performance.

-Sound as a way of communicating research findings e.g. through data sonification (Krygier 1994), podcasting (Antipod Sound Collective n.d.), or distributing mixtapes (Ball 2011).

-Creative geographies of sound and music-making; sound art and installation (Wells and Baily 2018); intermedia performance; fluxus sound; protest music, sound and noise (Tausig 2018) etc.

-Spatial techniques in music composition and production , e.g. as in musique concrète and acousmatic music (Terrugi 2019).

-The thresholds between sound, noise, music and silence (Cage 2011, Mohaghegh and Golestaneh 2011, Attali 1985).

-Other approaches to sound.

References:
Antipod Sound Collective. n.d. “Antipod: A Radical Geography Podcast and Sound Collective.” Accessed October 14, 2019. https://thisisantipod.org/.

Attali, Jacques. 1985. Noise: The Political Economy of Music. Theory and History of Literature, v. 16. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Ball, Jared A. 2011. I Mix What I like! A Mixtape Manifesto. Oakland: AK Press.

Born, Georgina, ed. 2013. Music, Sound and Space: Transformations of Public and Private Experience. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Brigstocke, Julian, and Tehseen Noorani. 2016. “Posthuman Attunements: Aesthetics, Authority and the Arts of Creative Listening.” GeoHumanities 2 (1): 1–7.

Butler, Toby. 2006. “A Walk of Art: The Potential of the Sound Walk as Practice in Cultural Geography.” Social & Cultural Geography 7 (6): 889–908.

Cage, John. 2011. Silence: Lectures and Writings. 19. pr. Middletown, Conn: Wesleyan Univ. Press.

Daughtry, J. Martin. 2014. “Thanatosonics.” Social Text 32 (2): 25–51.

Duffy, Michelle, and Gordon Waitt. 2011. “Sound Diaries.” Aether VII: 119–36.

Gallagher, Michael. 2016. “Sound as Affect: Difference, Power and Spatiality.” Emotion, Space and Society 20 (August): 42–48.

Gallagher, Michael, and Jonathan Prior. 2014. “Sonic Geographies: Exploring Phonographic Methods.” Progress in Human Geography 38 (2): 267–84.

Goodman, Steve. 2010. Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear. Technologies of Lived Abstraction. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Kanngieser, Anja. 2012. “A Sonic Geography of Voice: Towards an Affective Politics.” Progress in Human Geography 36 (3): 336–53.
———. 2015. “Geopolitics and the Anthropocene: Five Propositions for Sound.” GeoHumanities 1 (1): 80–85.

Krygier, John B. 1994. “Sound and Geographic Visualization.” In Modern Cartography Series, 2:149–66. Elsevier.

Massey, Doreen. 2005. For Space. London: Sage.

McKittrick, Katherine. 2016. “Rebellion/Invention/Groove.” Small Axe 20 (1 49): 79–91.

Mohaghegh, Jason B, and Seema Golestaneh. 2011. “Haunted Sound: Nothingness, Movement, and the Minimalist Imagination.” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 29 (3): 485–98.

Moten, Fred. 2017. Black and Blur. Consent Not to Be a Single Being, v. [1]. Durham ; London: Duke University Press.

Revill, George. 2000. “Music and the Politics of Sound: Nationalism, Citizenship, and Auditory Space.” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 18 (5): 597–613.

Rich, Jennifer Sarah. 2017. “Sounding out the Pastoral Landscape in Chris Watson’s Inside the Circle of Fire: A Sheffield Sound Map.” Cultural Geographies 24 (3): 403–19.

Sassen, S. 2013. “Does the City Have Speech?” Public Culture 25 (2 70): 209–21.

Stoever, Jennifer Lynn. 2016. The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening. Postmillennial Pop. New York: New York University Press.

Tausig, Benjamin. 2018. “Sound and Movement.” Social Text 36 (3): 25–45.

Terrugi, Daniel. 2019. “Spaces of Mind.” In Specters. Shelter Press.

Wells, Karen, and Ain Bailey. 2018. “Sound Art and the Making of Public Space.” Social & Cultural Geography, October, 1–20.




Description

This session explores the geographies of sound. Sound is ubiquitous in shaping daily life, embodied experience, public and private space, and imaginaries about people and places (Born 2013). Sound also helps configure non-human life processes and impacts certain inorganic flows. Sound is used for production and methods of extraction (e.g. emitting and reading seismic vibrations for oil extraction), facilitating metabolic flows of capital between "nature" and "society." Sound can also be used for torture and warfare (Goodman 2010). It also engenders subjectivities, often along hierarchies of class, gender, sexuality, nation, ability and more (Stoever 2016, Revill 2000). At the same time, it can denaturalize grids of power, often through creative practices, musical or not (McKittrick 2016, Moten 2017, Tausig 2018), and create affective solidarities beyond utterance between people, places, systems and species (Kanngieser 2015). With its own particular richness, sound helps create worlds in layered and often contrasting and contentious ways. Given sound’s importance and the variety of its influence on space, an increasing number of geographers have begun to pursue sound empirically, theoretically and methodologically. This session attends to sound as something that shapes space, and vice versa, with its own particular properties, paying particular attention to the political ramifications of sound geography. It likewise highlights papers that embrace sound as a mode of inquiry (e.g. listening), as a research method (Gallagher and Prior 2014), and/or as a way to communicate research findings.

References:
Born, Georgina, ed. 2013. Music, Sound and Space: Transformations of Public and Private Experience. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Gallagher, Michael, and Jonathan Prior. 2014. “Sonic Geographies: Exploring Phonographic Methods.” Progress in Human Geography 38 (2): 267–84.

Goodman, Steve. 2010. Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear. Technologies of Lived Abstraction. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Kanngieser, Anja. 2015. “Geopolitics and the Anthropocene: Five Propositions for Sound.” GeoHumanities 1 (1): 80–85.

McKittrick, Katherine. 2016. “Rebellion/Invention/Groove.” Small Axe 20 (1 49): 79–91.

Moten, Fred. 2017. Black and Blur. Consent Not to Be a Single Being, v. [1]. Durham ; London: Duke University Press.

Revill, George. 2000. “Music and the Politics of Sound: Nationalism, Citizenship, and Auditory Space.” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 18 (5): 597–613.

Stoever, Jennifer Lynn. 2016. The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening. Postmillennial Pop. New York: New York University Press.

Tausig, Benjamin. 2018. “Sound and Movement.” Social Text 36 (3): 25–45.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Luke Leavitt*, University of Wisconsin - Madison, How can music composition be deployed as geographical research? 15 8:40 AM
Presenter Damien Masson*, Université de Cergy-Pontoise. Laboratoire MRTE, Pianos in public space: Atmospheric powers of a sonic object 15 8:55 AM
Presenter Wen Lin*, Newcastle University, Recording and sharing urban sounds in the Web 2.0 age 15 9:10 AM
Presenter Shaundra Cunningham*, University of Tennessee, "If I Can't Say a Word, I'll Just Wave my Hands": Exploring a Womanist Geography of Sermons 15 9:25 AM

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