Rethinking Space and Place in Critical Environmental Justice through Critical Race Geographies

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Latinx Geographies Specialty Group, Black Geographies Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/8/2020
Start / End Time: 11:10 AM / 12:25 PM
Room: Granite B, Hyatt Regency, Third Floor
Organizers: Cristina Faiver-Serna, Erin Goodling, Tianna Bruno
Chairs: Cristina Faiver-Serna

Call for Submissions

Black Geographies and Latinx Geographies builds on the critical scholarship of geographers long working at the intersections of Critical Race Studies and Geography (see: Pulido 1996, 2002; Gilmore 2002, 2007; Woods 1998), and goes beyond calls within the discipline of Geography for a deeper engagement with critical race theory and research. Such scholarship has pushed the bounds of Geography to more critically engage with studies of race, processes of racialization, racial capitalism and counter-hegemonic ways of knowing space and place. These sub-fields work to speak life, agency, and non-Eurocentric forms of knowledge production into how Geography frames and discusses communities of color (McKittrick 2011; Ybarra and Munoz 2019; Woods 1998, 2017).

In recent years, critical environmental justice (CEJ) scholars have drawn on Critical Race Studies to argue for an understanding of environmental injustice as state-sanctioned racial violence. Naming environmental injustice as state-sanctioned racial violence necessarily emphasizes the state’s investments in the systems, institutions, and processes of racial capitalism that perpetuate it (Pellow 2018; Pulido 2016a, 2016b; Pulido and De Lara 2018; Pulido, Kohl, Cotton 2016). CEJ aims to push the bounds of traditional EJ scholarship to engage with the nuances of race, racism, and racialization through intersectional methodologies and multiscalar paradigms (Pellow 2018).

Scholarship at the intersection of CEJ and Critical Race Geographies has begun to bring depth and nuance to understandings of racial violence of, and resistance to, environmental racism (see: Vasudevan 2019; Williams 2018; Wright 2018). Scholarship situated within Black and Latinx Geographies, in particular, has made possible critical scholarly perspectives on the simultaneous devaluation of bodies of color and the environment, by drawing on ways of understanding space and place that have been traditionally silenced within Geography (McKittrick 2006, 2011; Muñoz and Ybarra 2019). We build on this work to ask: How might critical race geographies enable deeper engagement in critical studies of environmental injustice and counter-hegemonic knowledge of space and place?

This session seeks papers that:
- Bring together scholars drawing on critical race geographies, such as Black Geographies, Latinx Geographies, as well as Asian American and Pacific Islander geographies, and Indigenous + Decolonial geographies, and critical environmental justice studies

- Engage with the work of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) novelists, artists, poets, or public intellectuals

- Critically examine the racial logics that make environmental racism possible, and the racial projects that are made possible through environmental racism

- Present creative and critical methodologies for working at the intersection of Critical Race Geographies and CEJ studies

- Re-conceptualize place and space within communities of color facing environmental injustice


Works cited:

Ruth Wilson Gilmore (2007) Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California. Berkeley: University of California Press.

— (2002) Fatal Couplings of Power and Difference: Notes on Racism and Geography. The Professional Geographer 54(1): 15-24.

McKittrick Katherine (2011) On Plantations, Prisons, and a Black Sense of Place. Journal of Social and Cultural Geography 12:8 947-963.

— (2006) Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Muñoz, Lorena and Megan Ybarra (2019) Introduction: Latinx Geographies. Society and Space. www.societyandspace.org/2019/01/23/introduction-latinx-geographies/

Pellow, David (2018) What is Critical Environmental Justice? Cambridge and Medford: Polity Press.

Pulido, Laura (2016a) Geographies of race and ethnicity II: Environmental racism, racial capitalism and state-sanctioned violence. Progress in Human Geography 41(4): 524-533.

— (2016b) Flint, Environmental Racism, and Racial Capitalism. Capitalism Nature Socialism 27:3, 1-16.

— (2002) Reflections on a White Discipline. The Professional Geographer 54:1, 42-49.

— (1996) Environmentalism and Economic Justice: Two Chicano Struggles in the Southwest. The University of Arizona Press.

Pulido, Laura and Juan De Lara (2018) Reimagining ‘justice’ in environmental justice: Radical ecologies, decolonial thought, and the Black Radical Tradition. Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 1:1-2, 76-98.

Pulido, Laura, Ellen Kohl, and Nicole Marie Cotton (2016) State Regulation and Environmental Justice: The Need for Strategy Reassessment. Capitalism Nature Socialism 27:2, 12-31.

Williams, Brian (2018) “That we may live”: Pesticides, plantations, and environmental racism in the United States South. Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 1:1-2, 243-267.

Woods, Clyde (1998) Development Arrested: The Blues and Plantation Power in the Mississippi Delta. Verso Books.

— (2017) Development Drowned and Reborn: The Blues and Bourbon Restorations in Post-Katrina New Orleans. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Wright, Willie Jamal (2018) As Above, So Below: Anti-Black Violence as Environmental Racism. Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography.

Vasudevan, Pavithra (2019) An Intimate Inventory of Race and Waste. Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography.


Description

Scholarship at the intersection of Critical Environmental Justice studies and Critical Race Geographies has begun to bring depth and nuance to understandings of racial violence of, and resistance to, environmental racism. Scholarship situated within Black and Latinx Geographies, in particular, has made possible critical scholarly perspectives on the simultaneous devaluation of bodies of color and the environment, by drawing on ways of understanding space and place that have been traditionally silenced within Geography. We build on this work to ask: How might critical race geographies enable deeper engagement in critical studies of environmental injustice and counter-hegemonic knowledge of space and place?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Levi Van Sant*, George Mason University, Conserving What? Conservation Easements and Environmental Justice in the Coastal US South 15 11:10 AM
Presenter Ellen Kohl*, St. Mary's College of Maryland, Organizing in the Trump Era: Environmental justice activist’s responses to regulation 15 11:25 AM
Presenter Cristina Faiver-Serna*, , Cultural appropriation as a neoliberal 'spatial fix': Promotoras de salud and air pollution in Southern California 15 11:40 AM
Presenter Tianna Bruno*, University of Oregon, Environmental Injustice and Black Sense of Place in the Biophysical and Social Afterlife of Slavery 15 11:55 AM
Discussant Juan De Lara University of Southern California 15 12:10 PM

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