Something old, something new, and something borrowed: defining urbanity II

Type: Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Urban Geography Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/6/2020
Start / End Time: 9:35 AM / 10:50 AM
Room: Plaza Court 4, Sheraton, Concourse Level
Organizers: Jaana Vanhatalo, Michael Commons
Chairs: Michael Commons

Description

This session is part of a session series, which includes two paper sessions (I-II) and a panel session (III).
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The urban environment is a dynamic, emergent formation resulting from the interplay between a variety of phenomena, from social and cultural to economic and ecological processes. These processes and their interrelations are complex and multifaceted. The common denominator for these is the platform - the city. However, the definition of the city, or the urban area, is most often ambiguous. Although the world is changing as a result of urbanization affecting the spatial and functional dependencies in urban regions, the official definitions of the urban areas and the methods of identifying them have remained surprisingly traditional and fixed. Such dualistic view between the city and the countryside has been questioned for decades in urban theory, enabling alternative approaches to define urbanity.

In 2016 United Nations launched a collaborative project with European Commission to study the global applicability of the EU method for urban and rural area classification (i.e. the Degree of Urbanization; DEGURBA). Currently, the method is under scrutiny and the initial results are being evaluated and discussed. However, several questions arise: can there be a single universal definition for urban areas? Is it possible to define urban areas using quantitative measures alone? Should other methods or criteria be used to classify various types of urban areas? Do we need to define urban and rural areas?

The key issues regarding the challenge of defining the urban area could include the following:
- Critical views towards existing / universal definitions and criteria.
- What kind of new quantitative methods could be used to define urban, or rural, areas?
- What are the data-related challenges in defining urban areas?
- Can urban areas be defined entirely without the qualitative measures?
- What are the key characteristics of urbanity when defining urban areas?
- Why do we need urban area definitions? How should they be used?


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Gustavo Ovando-Montejo*, Utah State University, Spatiotemporal analysis of urban expansion in Mexico City: an approach using spatial metrics 15 9:35 AM
Presenter Jaana Vanhatalo*, Tampere University, Municipality level variation in urban areas of Finland resulting from different urban area definitions 15 9:50 AM
Presenter Milena Janiec Grygo*, Independent Researcher, Examining Urban Sprawl in Wesley Chapel, Florida through Textual Data and Remotely Sensed Imagery. 15 10:05 AM
Presenter Ying Tu*, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China, Bin Chen, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, Tao Zhang, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China, Bing Xu, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China, Regional mapping of essential urban land use categories: A testing case in Ningbo, China 15 10:20 AM
Presenter Bartosz Bartosiewicz*, University of Lodz, Szymon MarciƄczak, University of Lodz, Expanding or contracting? Development of functional urban regions in Poland after socialism 15 10:35 AM

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